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Crowdsourcing in proteomics: public resources lead to better experiments

(2013) AMINO ACIDS. 44(4). p.1129-1137
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Bioinformatics: from nucleotids to networks (N2N)
Abstract
With the growing interest in the field of proteomics, the amount of publicly available proteome resources has also increased dramatically. This means that there are many useful resources available for almost all aspects of a proteomics experiment. However, it remains vital to use the right resource, for the right purpose, at the right time. This review is therefore meant to aid the reader in obtaining an overview of the available resources and their application, thus providing the necessary background to choose the appropriate resources for the experiment at hand. Many of the resources are also taking advantage of so-called crowdsourcing to maximize the potential of the resource. What this means and how this can improve future experiments will also be discussed. The text roughly follows the steps involved in a proteomics experiment, starting with the planning of the experiment, via the processing of the data and the analysis of the results, to the community-wide sharing of the produced data.
Keywords
QUANTITATIVE PROTEOMICS, IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHMS, AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCES, MISSED CLEAVAGE SITES, INTERNATIONAL PROTEIN INDEX, INDUCED DISSOCIATION SPECTRA, MONITORING MASS-SPECTROMETRY, Repositories, Databases, Bioinformatics, Proteomics, Mass spectrometry, CHROMATOGRAPHIC ISOLATION, CONTAINING PEPTIDES, SOFTWARE TOOL

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Barsnes, Harald, and Lennart Martens. 2013. “Crowdsourcing in Proteomics: Public Resources Lead to Better Experiments.” Amino Acids 44 (4): 1129–1137.
APA
Barsnes, H., & Martens, L. (2013). Crowdsourcing in proteomics: public resources lead to better experiments. AMINO ACIDS, 44(4), 1129–1137.
Vancouver
1.
Barsnes H, Martens L. Crowdsourcing in proteomics: public resources lead to better experiments. AMINO ACIDS. 2013;44(4):1129–37.
MLA
Barsnes, Harald, and Lennart Martens. “Crowdsourcing in Proteomics: Public Resources Lead to Better Experiments.” AMINO ACIDS 44.4 (2013): 1129–1137. Print.
@article{3194235,
  abstract     = {With the growing interest in the field of proteomics, the amount of publicly available proteome resources has also increased dramatically. This means that there are many useful resources available for almost all aspects of a proteomics experiment. However, it remains vital to use the right resource, for the right purpose, at the right time. This review is therefore meant to aid the reader in obtaining an overview of the available resources and their application, thus providing the necessary background to choose the appropriate resources for the experiment at hand. Many of the resources are also taking advantage of so-called crowdsourcing to maximize the potential of the resource. What this means and how this can improve future experiments will also be discussed. The text roughly follows the steps involved in a proteomics experiment, starting with the planning of the experiment, via the processing of the data and the analysis of the results, to the community-wide sharing of the produced data.},
  author       = {Barsnes, Harald and Martens, Lennart},
  issn         = {0939-4451},
  journal      = {AMINO ACIDS},
  keyword      = {QUANTITATIVE PROTEOMICS,IDENTIFICATION ALGORITHMS,AMINO-ACID-SEQUENCES,MISSED CLEAVAGE SITES,INTERNATIONAL PROTEIN INDEX,INDUCED DISSOCIATION SPECTRA,MONITORING MASS-SPECTROMETRY,Repositories,Databases,Bioinformatics,Proteomics,Mass spectrometry,CHROMATOGRAPHIC ISOLATION,CONTAINING PEPTIDES,SOFTWARE TOOL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {1129--1137},
  title        = {Crowdsourcing in proteomics: public resources lead to better experiments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00726-012-1455-z},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2013},
}

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