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Organic matter fractions and N mineralization in vegetable-cropped sandy soils

(2013) SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT. 29(3). p.333-343
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Abstract
Soil organic nitrogen mineralization rates and possible predictors thereof were investigated for vegetable-growing soils in Belgium. Soil organic matter (SOM) was fractionated into sand (> 53 μm) and silt+clay (< 53 μm) fractions. The latter fraction was further separated into 6%NaOCl-oxidation labile (6%NaOCl-ox) and resistant N and C and subsequently into 10%HF-extractable (mineral bound) and resistant (recalcitrant) N and C. The N mineralization turnover rate (% of soil N/year) correlated with several of the investigated N or C fractions and stepwise linear regression confirmed that the 6%NaOCl-ox N was the best predictor. However, the small R² (0.42) of the regression model suggests that soil parameters other than the soil fractions isolated here would be required to explain the significant residual variation in N mineralization rate. A next step could be to look for alternative SOM fractionations capable of isolating bioavailable N. However, it would appear that the observed relationships between N fractions and N mineralization may not be causal but indirect. The number of vegetable crops per rotation did not influence N mineralization, but it did influence 6%NaOCl-ox N, probably as an effect of differences in crop residues returned and organic manure supply. However, the nature of this relation between management, SOM quality and N mineralization is not clear. Explanation of correlations between N mineralization and presumed bioavailable N fractions, like the 6%NaOCl-ox N, requires further mechanistic elucidation of the N mineralization process.
Keywords
intensive vegetable production, soil organic matter, soil fractionation, sandy soils, Nitrogen mineralization, PARTICLE-SIZE FRACTIONS, LAND-USE HISTORY, ARABLE SOILS, NITROGEN MINERALIZATION, MICROBIAL BIOMASS, EXTRACTION METHOD, CROPLAND SOILS, CLAY-MINERALS, CARBON, DYNAMICS

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Jegajeevagan, Kanagaratnam, Steven Sleutel, Nele Ameloot, et al. “Organic Matter Fractions and N Mineralization in Vegetable-cropped Sandy Soils.” SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT 29.3 (2013): 333–343. Print.
APA
Jegajeevagan, K., Sleutel, S., Ameloot, N., Kader, M. A., & De Neve, S. (2013). Organic matter fractions and N mineralization in vegetable-cropped sandy soils. SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT, 29(3), 333–343.
Chicago author-date
Jegajeevagan, Kanagaratnam, Steven Sleutel, Nele Ameloot, MD Abdul Kader, and Stefaan De Neve. 2013. “Organic Matter Fractions and N Mineralization in Vegetable-cropped Sandy Soils.” Soil Use and Management 29 (3): 333–343.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Jegajeevagan, Kanagaratnam, Steven Sleutel, Nele Ameloot, MD Abdul Kader, and Stefaan De Neve. 2013. “Organic Matter Fractions and N Mineralization in Vegetable-cropped Sandy Soils.” Soil Use and Management 29 (3): 333–343.
Vancouver
1.
Jegajeevagan K, Sleutel S, Ameloot N, Kader MA, De Neve S. Organic matter fractions and N mineralization in vegetable-cropped sandy soils. SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT. 2013;29(3):333–43.
IEEE
[1]
K. Jegajeevagan, S. Sleutel, N. Ameloot, M. A. Kader, and S. De Neve, “Organic matter fractions and N mineralization in vegetable-cropped sandy soils,” SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 333–343, 2013.
@article{3190396,
  abstract     = {Soil organic nitrogen mineralization rates and possible predictors thereof were investigated for vegetable-growing soils in Belgium. Soil organic matter (SOM) was fractionated into sand (> 53 μm) and silt+clay (< 53 μm) fractions. The latter fraction was further separated into 6%NaOCl-oxidation labile (6%NaOCl-ox) and resistant N and C and subsequently into 10%HF-extractable (mineral bound) and resistant (recalcitrant) N and C. The N mineralization turnover rate (% of soil N/year) correlated with several of the investigated N or C fractions and stepwise linear regression confirmed that the 6%NaOCl-ox N was the best predictor. However, the small R² (0.42) of the regression model suggests that soil parameters other than the soil fractions isolated here would be required to explain the significant residual variation in N mineralization rate. A next step could be to look for alternative SOM fractionations capable of isolating bioavailable N. However, it would appear that the observed relationships between N fractions and N mineralization may not be causal but indirect. The number of vegetable crops per rotation did not influence N mineralization, but it did influence 6%NaOCl-ox N, probably as an effect of differences in crop residues returned and organic manure supply. However, the nature of this relation between management, SOM quality and N mineralization is not clear. Explanation of correlations between N mineralization and presumed bioavailable N fractions, like the 6%NaOCl-ox N, requires further mechanistic elucidation of the N mineralization process.},
  author       = {Jegajeevagan, Kanagaratnam and Sleutel, Steven and Ameloot, Nele and Kader, MD Abdul and De Neve, Stefaan},
  issn         = {0266-0032},
  journal      = {SOIL USE AND MANAGEMENT},
  keywords     = {intensive vegetable production,soil organic matter,soil fractionation,sandy soils,Nitrogen mineralization,PARTICLE-SIZE FRACTIONS,LAND-USE HISTORY,ARABLE SOILS,NITROGEN MINERALIZATION,MICROBIAL BIOMASS,EXTRACTION METHOD,CROPLAND SOILS,CLAY-MINERALS,CARBON,DYNAMICS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {333--343},
  title        = {Organic matter fractions and N mineralization in vegetable-cropped sandy soils},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sum.12044},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2013},
}

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