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Unraveling the microbiota of teat apices of clinically healthy lactating dairy cows, with special emphasis on coagulase-negative staphylococci

G Braem, Sarne De Vliegher UGent, B Verbist, Veerle Piessens, E Van Coillie, L De Vuyst and F Leroy (2013) JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. 96(3). p.1499-1510
abstract
Swab samples (n = 72) obtained from the teat apex of lactating dairy cows without visual signs of inflammation (n = 18) were gathered on 2 well-managed Flemish dairy herds (herds 1 and 2) during the same month to assess the bacterial diversity of teat apices before milking. A combination of both culture-dependent [plating and (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting of the colonies] and culture-independent [denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE)] techniques indicated that the teat apices contain a wide diversity of bacterial genera. Despite a low bacterial load, 20 bacterial genera of 3 phyla (Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) were present. The most prevalent bacteria were the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), encompassing a total of 15 species, which were identified to the species level using a combination of (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting, gene sequencing (16S ribosomal RNA and rpoB genes), and a novel PCR-DGGE technique based on the tuf-PCR amplicon. Overall bacterial diversity did not differ significantly between the herds or between noninfected and subclinically infected quarters in herd 1. In herd 1, borderline significant lower CNS species diversity was found on teat apices of noninfected quarters compared with subclinically infected quarters. The most prevalent CNS species were Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus eguorum in both herds and Staphylococcus carnosus in herd 2.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
1ST LACTATION, UDDER HEALTH, BACILLUS-CEREUS, GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS, RISK-FACTORS, BOVINE MASTITIS, MASTITIS PATHOGENS, INTRAMAMMARY INFECTIONS, SOMATIC-CELL COUNT, udder health, teat apex, bacterial species diversity, coagulase-negative staphylococci, MILK
journal title
JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE
J. Dairy Sci.
volume
96
issue
3
pages
1499 - 1510
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000315061700017
JCR category
AGRICULTURE, DAIRY & ANIMAL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
2.55 (2013)
JCR rank
2/52 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0022-0302
DOI
10.3168/jds.2012-5493
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3188737
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3188737
date created
2013-04-09 13:54:01
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:38:15
@article{3188737,
  abstract     = {Swab samples (n = 72) obtained from the teat apex of lactating dairy cows without visual signs of inflammation (n = 18) were gathered on 2 well-managed Flemish dairy herds (herds 1 and 2) during the same month to assess the bacterial diversity of teat apices before milking. A combination of both culture-dependent [plating and (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting of the colonies] and culture-independent [denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE)] techniques indicated that the teat apices contain a wide diversity of bacterial genera. Despite a low bacterial load, 20 bacterial genera of 3 phyla (Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria) were present. The most prevalent bacteria were the coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), encompassing a total of 15 species, which were identified to the species level using a combination of (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprinting, gene sequencing (16S ribosomal RNA and rpoB genes), and a novel PCR-DGGE technique based on the tuf-PCR amplicon. Overall bacterial diversity did not differ significantly between the herds or between noninfected and subclinically infected quarters in herd 1. In herd 1, borderline significant lower CNS species diversity was found on teat apices of noninfected quarters compared with subclinically infected quarters. The most prevalent CNS species were Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus eguorum in both herds and Staphylococcus carnosus in herd 2.},
  author       = {Braem, G and De Vliegher, Sarne and Verbist, B and Piessens, Veerle and Van Coillie, E and De Vuyst, L and Leroy, F},
  issn         = {0022-0302},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {1ST LACTATION,UDDER HEALTH,BACILLUS-CEREUS,GEL-ELECTROPHORESIS,RISK-FACTORS,BOVINE MASTITIS,MASTITIS PATHOGENS,INTRAMAMMARY INFECTIONS,SOMATIC-CELL COUNT,udder health,teat apex,bacterial species diversity,coagulase-negative staphylococci,MILK},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1499--1510},
  title        = {Unraveling the microbiota of teat apices of clinically healthy lactating dairy cows, with special emphasis on coagulase-negative staphylococci},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3168/jds.2012-5493},
  volume       = {96},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Braem, G, Sarne De Vliegher, B Verbist, Veerle Piessens, E Van Coillie, L De Vuyst, and F Leroy. 2013. “Unraveling the Microbiota of Teat Apices of Clinically Healthy Lactating Dairy Cows, with Special Emphasis on Coagulase-negative Staphylococci.” Journal of Dairy Science 96 (3): 1499–1510.
APA
Braem, G, De Vliegher, S., Verbist, B., Piessens, V., Van Coillie, E., De Vuyst, L., & Leroy, F. (2013). Unraveling the microbiota of teat apices of clinically healthy lactating dairy cows, with special emphasis on coagulase-negative staphylococci. JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE, 96(3), 1499–1510.
Vancouver
1.
Braem G, De Vliegher S, Verbist B, Piessens V, Van Coillie E, De Vuyst L, et al. Unraveling the microbiota of teat apices of clinically healthy lactating dairy cows, with special emphasis on coagulase-negative staphylococci. JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE. 2013;96(3):1499–510.
MLA
Braem, G, Sarne De Vliegher, B Verbist, et al. “Unraveling the Microbiota of Teat Apices of Clinically Healthy Lactating Dairy Cows, with Special Emphasis on Coagulase-negative Staphylococci.” JOURNAL OF DAIRY SCIENCE 96.3 (2013): 1499–1510. Print.