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Identification of a complex genetic network underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae colony morphology

Karin Voordeckers, Dries De Maeyer, Elisa van der Zande, Marcelo D Vinces, Wim Meert, Lore Cloots, Owen Ryan, Kathleen Marchal UGent and Kevin J Verstrepen (2012) MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY. 86(1). p.225-239
abstract
When grown on solid substrates, different microorganisms often form colonies with very specific morphologies. Whereas the pioneers of microbiology often used colony morphology to discriminate between species and strains, the phenomenon has not received much attention recently. In this study, we use a genome-wide assay in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify all genes that affect colony morphology. We show that several major signalling cascades, including the MAPK, TORC, SNF1 and RIM101 pathways play a role, indicating that morphological changes are a reaction to changing environments. Other genes that affect colony morphology are involved in protein sorting and epigenetic regulation. Interestingly, the screen reveals only few genes that are likely to play a direct role in establishing colony morphology, with one notable example being FLO11, a gene encoding a cell-surface adhesin that has already been implicated in colony morphology, biofilm formation, and invasive and pseudohyphal growth. Using a series of modified promoters for fine-tuning FLO11 expression, we confirm the central role of Flo11 and show that differences in FLO11 expression result in distinct colony morphologies. Together, our results provide a first comprehensive look at the complex genetic network that underlies the diversity in the morphologies of yeast colonies.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
ACTIVATED PROTEIN-KINASE, BIOLOGICAL NETWORKS, TERMINAL ACETYLTRANSFERASE, ACTIN-RELATED PROTEINS, FILAMENTOUS GROWTH, INVASIVE GROWTH, MAT FORMATION, SIGNALING PATHWAYS, YEAST COLONIES, RIM101 PATHWAY
journal title
MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY
Mol. Microbiol.
volume
86
issue
1
pages
225 - 239
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000309063600019
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.961 (2012)
JCR rank
19/116 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0950-382X
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2958.2012.08192.x
project
Bioinformatics: from nucleotids to networks (N2N)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3185979
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3185979
date created
2013-04-08 13:17:28
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:25
@article{3185979,
  abstract     = {When grown on solid substrates, different microorganisms often form colonies with very specific morphologies. Whereas the pioneers of microbiology often used colony morphology to discriminate between species and strains, the phenomenon has not received much attention recently. In this study, we use a genome-wide assay in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify all genes that affect colony morphology. We show that several major signalling cascades, including the MAPK, TORC, SNF1 and RIM101 pathways play a role, indicating that morphological changes are a reaction to changing environments. Other genes that affect colony morphology are involved in protein sorting and epigenetic regulation. Interestingly, the screen reveals only few genes that are likely to play a direct role in establishing colony morphology, with one notable example being FLO11, a gene encoding a cell-surface adhesin that has already been implicated in colony morphology, biofilm formation, and invasive and pseudohyphal growth. Using a series of modified promoters for fine-tuning FLO11 expression, we confirm the central role of Flo11 and show that differences in FLO11 expression result in distinct colony morphologies. Together, our results provide a first comprehensive look at the complex genetic network that underlies the diversity in the morphologies of yeast colonies.},
  author       = {Voordeckers, Karin and De Maeyer, Dries and van der Zande, Elisa and Vinces, Marcelo D and Meert, Wim and Cloots, Lore and Ryan, Owen and Marchal, Kathleen and Verstrepen, Kevin J},
  issn         = {0950-382X},
  journal      = {MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {ACTIVATED PROTEIN-KINASE,BIOLOGICAL NETWORKS,TERMINAL ACETYLTRANSFERASE,ACTIN-RELATED PROTEINS,FILAMENTOUS GROWTH,INVASIVE GROWTH,MAT FORMATION,SIGNALING PATHWAYS,YEAST COLONIES,RIM101 PATHWAY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {225--239},
  title        = {Identification of a complex genetic network underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae colony morphology},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2958.2012.08192.x},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Voordeckers, Karin, Dries De Maeyer, Elisa van der Zande, Marcelo D Vinces, Wim Meert, Lore Cloots, Owen Ryan, Kathleen Marchal, and Kevin J Verstrepen. 2012. “Identification of a Complex Genetic Network Underlying Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Colony Morphology.” Molecular Microbiology 86 (1): 225–239.
APA
Voordeckers, K., De Maeyer, D., van der Zande, E., Vinces, M. D., Meert, W., Cloots, L., Ryan, O., et al. (2012). Identification of a complex genetic network underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae colony morphology. MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY, 86(1), 225–239.
Vancouver
1.
Voordeckers K, De Maeyer D, van der Zande E, Vinces MD, Meert W, Cloots L, et al. Identification of a complex genetic network underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae colony morphology. MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY. 2012;86(1):225–39.
MLA
Voordeckers, Karin, Dries De Maeyer, Elisa van der Zande, et al. “Identification of a Complex Genetic Network Underlying Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Colony Morphology.” MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY 86.1 (2012): 225–239. Print.