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Application of medium-chain fatty acids in drinking water increases Campylobacter jejuni colonization threshold in broiler chicks

David Hermans (UGent) , An Martel (UGent) , An Garmyn (UGent) , Marc Verlinden (UGent) , Marc Heyndrickx (UGent) , Inne Gantois (UGent) , Freddy Haesebrouck (UGent) and Frank Pasmans (UGent)
(2012) POULTRY SCIENCE. 91(7). p.1733-1738
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Abstract
Campylobacteriosis is the most reported bacterial-mediated gastroenteritic disease in many developed countries. Broiler chickens are a natural host for Campylobacter spp., and contaminated poultry meat products are a major source for transmitting pathogenic Campylobacter strains to humans. Currently, no intervention measure efficiently and effectively controls this pathogen in poultry flocks. Medium-chain fatty acids (caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids) show a marked anti-Campylobacter activity in vitro. However, in recent trials using our in vivo models, administering these acids to the feed of broiler chicks neither prevented nor reduced cecal C. jejuni colonization in broilers. In the present study, we examined whether a drinking water application of medium-chain fatty acids might be more effective in combating Campylobacter colonization in poultry. Although Campylobacter colonization and transmission was not reduced, we demonstrate that adding an emulsion of a mixture of caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids to the drinking water of broiler chicks reduces their colonization susceptibility and prevents C. jejuni survival in drinking water. Thus, the merit of water applications of medium-chain fatty acids is the reduction of the probability of Campylobacter entry into and transmission throughout a flock.
Keywords
medium-chain fatty acid, water application, broiler chicken, Campylobacter jejuni, colonization threshold, ORGANIC-ACIDS, POULTRY, INFECTION, CONTAMINATION

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Chicago
Hermans, David, An Martel, An Garmyn, Marc Verlinden, Marc Heyndrickx, Inne Gantois, Freddy Haesebrouck, and Frank Pasmans. 2012. “Application of Medium-chain Fatty Acids in Drinking Water Increases Campylobacter Jejuni Colonization Threshold in Broiler Chicks.” Poultry Science 91 (7): 1733–1738.
APA
Hermans, David, Martel, A., Garmyn, A., Verlinden, M., Heyndrickx, M., Gantois, I., Haesebrouck, F., et al. (2012). Application of medium-chain fatty acids in drinking water increases Campylobacter jejuni colonization threshold in broiler chicks. POULTRY SCIENCE, 91(7), 1733–1738.
Vancouver
1.
Hermans D, Martel A, Garmyn A, Verlinden M, Heyndrickx M, Gantois I, et al. Application of medium-chain fatty acids in drinking water increases Campylobacter jejuni colonization threshold in broiler chicks. POULTRY SCIENCE. 2012;91(7):1733–8.
MLA
Hermans, David, An Martel, An Garmyn, et al. “Application of Medium-chain Fatty Acids in Drinking Water Increases Campylobacter Jejuni Colonization Threshold in Broiler Chicks.” POULTRY SCIENCE 91.7 (2012): 1733–1738. Print.
@article{3156986,
  abstract     = {Campylobacteriosis is the most reported bacterial-mediated gastroenteritic disease in many developed countries. Broiler chickens are a natural host for Campylobacter spp., and contaminated poultry meat products are a major source for transmitting pathogenic Campylobacter strains to humans. Currently, no intervention measure efficiently and effectively controls this pathogen in poultry flocks. Medium-chain fatty acids (caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids) show a marked anti-Campylobacter activity in vitro. However, in recent trials using our in vivo models, administering these acids to the feed of broiler chicks neither prevented nor reduced cecal C. jejuni colonization in broilers. In the present study, we examined whether a drinking water application of medium-chain fatty acids might be more effective in combating Campylobacter colonization in poultry. Although Campylobacter colonization and transmission was not reduced, we demonstrate that adding an emulsion of a mixture of caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids to the drinking water of broiler chicks reduces their colonization susceptibility and prevents C. jejuni survival in drinking water. Thus, the merit of water applications of medium-chain fatty acids is the reduction of the probability of Campylobacter entry into and transmission throughout a flock.},
  author       = {Hermans, David and Martel, An and Garmyn, An and Verlinden, Marc and Heyndrickx, Marc and Gantois, Inne and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Pasmans, Frank},
  issn         = {0032-5791},
  journal      = {POULTRY SCIENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1733--1738},
  title        = {Application of medium-chain fatty acids in drinking water increases Campylobacter jejuni colonization threshold in broiler chicks},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3382/ps.2011-02106},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2012},
}

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