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Two hundred years of a diverse Daphnia community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): effects of natural and human-induced environmental changes

(2004) FRESHWATER BIOLOGY. 49(8). p.998-1013
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a climate-sensitive lake in Kenya which over the past 200 years has experienced a series of well-documented natural and anthropogenic environmental changes., 2. Contiguous sampling and analysis of four cores yielded ephippial capsules of eight Daphnia species. Only two of these had been recorded previously in live collections from Lake Naivasha, 1. We used fossil diapausing eggs extracted from (210)Pb-dated sediment cores to reconstruct historical changes in the Daphnia community of Lake Naivasha, and one species is new to science. The four more common species (Daphnia barbata, D. laevis, D. magna, and D. pulex) show striking differences in abundance patterns and population dynamics through time. Four other species (D. lumholtzi, D. curvirostris, D. longispina s.l., and Daphnia sp. nov. type Limuru.) appear to have been present only occasionally. Nevertheless, between 1895 and 1915 seven species of Daphnia inhabited Lake Naivasha simultaneously., 3. Despite considerable natural environmental change associated with climate-driven lake-level fluctuations, the Daphnia community of Lake Naivasha has been severely affected by human activities over the past century, especially the introduction of exotic fishes and water-quality changes because of agricultural soil erosion. The recent reappearance of large-bodied Daphnia species (D. magna, D. barbata, D. lumholtzi, Daphnia sp. nov. type Limuru) after 20-110 years of absence can be explained by their release from fish predation, following a dramatic increase in turbidity caused by excess clastic sediment input from eroded catchment soils. The small-bodied species D. laevis has fared less well recently, presumably because the benefit of lowered predation pressure is counteracted by more pronounced negative effects of increased turbidity on this species and loss of submerged macrophyte beds which formerly served as predation refuge., 4. Our results suggest that, despite considerable environmental instability and the absence of specialised zooplanktivores, top-down control of fish on large zooplankton is important in Lake Naivasha. Predation pressure from fish has led to clear-cut shifts in local Daphnia species composition, but failed to drive the larger taxa to extinction.

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MLA
Mergeay, Joachim, Dirk Verschuren, Liesbeth Van Kerckhoven, et al. “Two Hundred Years of a Diverse Daphnia Community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): Effects of Natural and Human-induced Environmental Changes.” FRESHWATER BIOLOGY 49.8 (2004): 998–1013. Print.
APA
Mergeay, J., Verschuren, D., Van Kerckhoven, L., & De Meester, L. (2004). Two hundred years of a diverse Daphnia community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): effects of natural and human-induced environmental changes. FRESHWATER BIOLOGY, 49(8), 998–1013.
Chicago author-date
Mergeay, Joachim, Dirk Verschuren, Liesbeth Van Kerckhoven, and Luc De Meester. 2004. “Two Hundred Years of a Diverse Daphnia Community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): Effects of Natural and Human-induced Environmental Changes.” Freshwater Biology 49 (8): 998–1013.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Mergeay, Joachim, Dirk Verschuren, Liesbeth Van Kerckhoven, and Luc De Meester. 2004. “Two Hundred Years of a Diverse Daphnia Community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): Effects of Natural and Human-induced Environmental Changes.” Freshwater Biology 49 (8): 998–1013.
Vancouver
1.
Mergeay J, Verschuren D, Van Kerckhoven L, De Meester L. Two hundred years of a diverse Daphnia community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): effects of natural and human-induced environmental changes. FRESHWATER BIOLOGY. 2004;49(8):998–1013.
IEEE
[1]
J. Mergeay, D. Verschuren, L. Van Kerckhoven, and L. De Meester, “Two hundred years of a diverse Daphnia community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): effects of natural and human-induced environmental changes,” FRESHWATER BIOLOGY, vol. 49, no. 8, pp. 998–1013, 2004.
@article{315674,
  author       = {Mergeay, Joachim and Verschuren, Dirk and Van Kerckhoven, Liesbeth and De Meester, Luc},
  issn         = {0046-5070},
  journal      = {FRESHWATER BIOLOGY},
  keywords     = {a climate-sensitive lake in Kenya which over the past 200 years has experienced a series of well-documented natural and anthropogenic environmental changes.,2. Contiguous sampling and analysis of four cores yielded ephippial capsules of eight Daphnia species. Only two of these had been recorded previously in live collections from Lake Naivasha,1. We used fossil diapausing eggs extracted from (210)Pb-dated sediment cores to reconstruct historical changes in the Daphnia community of Lake Naivasha,and one species is new to science. The four more common species (Daphnia barbata,D. laevis,D. magna,and D. pulex) show striking differences in abundance patterns and population dynamics through time. Four other species (D. lumholtzi,D. curvirostris,D. longispina s.l.,and Daphnia sp. nov. type Limuru.) appear to have been present only occasionally. Nevertheless,between 1895 and 1915 seven species of Daphnia inhabited Lake Naivasha simultaneously.,3. Despite considerable natural environmental change associated with climate-driven lake-level fluctuations,the Daphnia community of Lake Naivasha has been severely affected by human activities over the past century,especially the introduction of exotic fishes and water-quality changes because of agricultural soil erosion. The recent reappearance of large-bodied Daphnia species (D. magna,D. barbata,D. lumholtzi,Daphnia sp. nov. type Limuru) after 20-110 years of absence can be explained by their release from fish predation,following a dramatic increase in turbidity caused by excess clastic sediment input from eroded catchment soils. The small-bodied species D. laevis has fared less well recently,presumably because the benefit of lowered predation pressure is counteracted by more pronounced negative effects of increased turbidity on this species and loss of submerged macrophyte beds which formerly served as predation refuge.,4. Our results suggest that,despite considerable environmental instability and the absence of specialised zooplanktivores,top-down control of fish on large zooplankton is important in Lake Naivasha. Predation pressure from fish has led to clear-cut shifts in local Daphnia species composition,but failed to drive the larger taxa to extinction.},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {998--1013},
  title        = {Two hundred years of a diverse Daphnia community in Lake Naivasha (Kenya): effects of natural and human-induced environmental changes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2427.2004.01244.x},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2004},
}

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