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Roma antica, sacra, moderna: the analogous Romes of the travel guide

(2012) LIBRARY TRENDS. 61(2). p.397-417
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Abstract
The guidebook is not merely a registration of the city and its historical evolution or of the changing preferences of visitors but rather a device that selects and arranges aspects of the city-real as well as imaginary-into a coherent representation of that city. This is particularly the case in Rome, a city composed of three different entities: the ancient, the Christian, and-from the second half of the seventeenth century onward-the modern capital, each with their own monuments and histories. From the sixteenth century onward, Roman guidebooks use the categories of Roma antica, Roma sacra, and Roma moderna to define and represent these three components. In this essay, we argue that the changing application of these labels in the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries reflects not only the far-going physical transformation of the city during that period but also new ways of thinking about the identity of Rome. The reconfiguration of the three "Romes" in the space of the guidebook, operated by means of a continuous rearrangement of sections, illustrations, and descriptions, illustrates how successive authors and publishers attempted to fit the three well-established categories onto reality. An examination of how English visitors reacted to Rome will demonstrate how effective the categories of Roma antica, sacra, and moderna were in organizing the perception of the contemporary city and its analogs.

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Citation

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MLA
Delbeke, Maarten, and Anne-Françoise Morel. “Roma Antica, Sacra, Moderna: The Analogous Romes of the Travel Guide.” LIBRARY TRENDS, edited by Wouter Van Acker and Pieter Uyttenhove, vol. 61, no. 2, 2012, pp. 397–417.
APA
Delbeke, M., & Morel, A.-F. (2012). Roma antica, sacra, moderna: the analogous Romes of the travel guide. LIBRARY TRENDS, 61(2), 397–417.
Chicago author-date
Delbeke, Maarten, and Anne-Françoise Morel. 2012. “Roma Antica, Sacra, Moderna: The Analogous Romes of the Travel Guide.” Edited by Wouter Van Acker and Pieter Uyttenhove. LIBRARY TRENDS 61 (2): 397–417.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Delbeke, Maarten, and Anne-Françoise Morel. 2012. “Roma Antica, Sacra, Moderna: The Analogous Romes of the Travel Guide.” Ed by. Wouter Van Acker and Pieter Uyttenhove. LIBRARY TRENDS 61 (2): 397–417.
Vancouver
1.
Delbeke M, Morel A-F. Roma antica, sacra, moderna: the analogous Romes of the travel guide. Van Acker W, Uyttenhove P, editors. LIBRARY TRENDS. 2012;61(2):397–417.
IEEE
[1]
M. Delbeke and A.-F. Morel, “Roma antica, sacra, moderna: the analogous Romes of the travel guide,” LIBRARY TRENDS, vol. 61, no. 2, pp. 397–417, 2012.
@article{3139744,
  abstract     = {{The guidebook is not merely a registration of the city and its historical evolution or of the changing preferences of visitors but rather a device that selects and arranges aspects of the city-real as well as imaginary-into a coherent representation of that city. This is particularly the case in Rome, a city composed of three different entities: the ancient, the Christian, and-from the second half of the seventeenth century onward-the modern capital, each with their own monuments and histories. From the sixteenth century onward, Roman guidebooks use the categories of Roma antica, Roma sacra, and Roma moderna to define and represent these three components. In this essay, we argue that the changing application of these labels in the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries reflects not only the far-going physical transformation of the city during that period but also new ways of thinking about the identity of Rome. The reconfiguration of the three "Romes" in the space of the guidebook, operated by means of a continuous rearrangement of sections, illustrations, and descriptions, illustrates how successive authors and publishers attempted to fit the three well-established categories onto reality. An examination of how English visitors reacted to Rome will demonstrate how effective the categories of Roma antica, sacra, and moderna were in organizing the perception of the contemporary city and its analogs.}},
  author       = {{Delbeke, Maarten and Morel, Anne-Françoise}},
  editor       = {{Van Acker, Wouter and Uyttenhove, Pieter}},
  issn         = {{0024-2594}},
  journal      = {{LIBRARY TRENDS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{397--417}},
  title        = {{Roma antica, sacra, moderna: the analogous Romes of the travel guide}},
  volume       = {{61}},
  year         = {{2012}},
}

Web of Science
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