Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Introducing yesterday's phage therapy in today's medicine

Jean-Paul Pirnay, Gilbert Verbeken UGent, Thomas Rose, Malgorzata Jennes UGent, Martin Zizi, Isabelle Huys, Rob Lavigne, Maia Merabishvili UGent, Mario Vaneechoutte UGent, Angus Buckling, et al. (2012) FUTURE VIROLOGY. 7(4). p.379-390
abstract
The worldwide emergence of 'superbugs' and a dry antibiotic pipeline threaten modern society with a return to the preantibiotic era. Phages - the viruses of bacteria - could help fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Phage therapy was first attempted in 1919 by Felix d'Herelle and was commercially developed in the 1930s before being replaced by antibiotics in most of the western world. The current antibiotic crisis fueled a worldwide renaissance of phage therapy. The inherent potential of phages as natural biological bacterium controllers can only be put to use if the potential of the coevolutionary aspect of the couplet phage-bacterium is fully acknowledged and understood, including potential negative consequences. We must learn from past mistakes and set up credible studies to gather the urgently required data with regard to the efficacy of phage therapy and the evolutionary consequences of its (unlimited) use, Unfortunately, our current pharmaceutical economic model, implying costly and time-consuming medicinal product development and marketing, and requiring strong intellectual property protection, is not compatible with traditional sustainable phage therapy. A specific framework with realistic production and documentation requirements, which allows a timely (rapid) supply of safe, tailor-made, natural bacteriophages to patients, should be developed. Ultimately, economic models should be radically reshaped to cater for more sustainable approaches such as phage therapy. This is one of the biggest challenges faced by modern medicine and society as a whole.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
bacteriophage, antibiotic, bacterium, coevolution, drug, infection, medicinal product, multidrug-resistant, patent, phage, resistance, therapy, ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANCE, BACTERIOPHAGE THERAPY, ANTAGONISTIC COEVOLUTION, STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS, EVOLUTION, VIRUSES, INFECTION, POPULATION, EPIDEMICS, MODELS
journal title
FUTURE VIROLOGY
Future Virol.
volume
7
issue
4
pages
379 - 390
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000302395300010
JCR category
VIROLOGY
JCR impact factor
0.962 (2012)
JCR rank
30/34 (2012)
JCR quartile
4 (2012)
ISSN
1746-0794
DOI
10.2217/FVL.12.24
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
3137312
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3137312
date created
2013-02-20 15:25:18
date last changed
2017-10-23 06:58:37
@article{3137312,
  abstract     = {The worldwide emergence of 'superbugs' and a dry antibiotic pipeline threaten modern society with a return to the preantibiotic era. Phages - the viruses of bacteria - could help fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Phage therapy was first attempted in 1919 by Felix d'Herelle and was commercially developed in the 1930s before being replaced by antibiotics in most of the western world. The current antibiotic crisis fueled a worldwide renaissance of phage therapy. The inherent potential of phages as natural biological bacterium controllers can only be put to use if the potential of the coevolutionary aspect of the couplet phage-bacterium is fully acknowledged and understood, including potential negative consequences. We must learn from past mistakes and set up credible studies to gather the urgently required data with regard to the efficacy of phage therapy and the evolutionary consequences of its (unlimited) use, Unfortunately, our current pharmaceutical economic model, implying costly and time-consuming medicinal product development and marketing, and requiring strong intellectual property protection, is not compatible with traditional sustainable phage therapy. A specific framework with realistic production and documentation requirements, which allows a timely (rapid) supply of safe, tailor-made, natural bacteriophages to patients, should be developed. Ultimately, economic models should be radically reshaped to cater for more sustainable approaches such as phage therapy. This is one of the biggest challenges faced by modern medicine and society as a whole.},
  author       = {Pirnay, Jean-Paul and Verbeken, Gilbert and Rose, Thomas and Jennes, Malgorzata and Zizi, Martin and Huys, Isabelle and Lavigne, Rob and Merabishvili, Maia and Vaneechoutte, Mario and Buckling, Angus and De Vos, Daniel},
  issn         = {1746-0794},
  journal      = {FUTURE VIROLOGY},
  keyword      = {bacteriophage,antibiotic,bacterium,coevolution,drug,infection,medicinal product,multidrug-resistant,patent,phage,resistance,therapy,ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANCE,BACTERIOPHAGE THERAPY,ANTAGONISTIC COEVOLUTION,STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS,EVOLUTION,VIRUSES,INFECTION,POPULATION,EPIDEMICS,MODELS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {379--390},
  title        = {Introducing yesterday's phage therapy in today's medicine},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/FVL.12.24},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Pirnay, Jean-Paul, Gilbert Verbeken, Thomas Rose, Malgorzata Jennes, Martin Zizi, Isabelle Huys, Rob Lavigne, et al. 2012. “Introducing Yesterday’s Phage Therapy in Today's Medicine.” Future Virology 7 (4): 379–390.
APA
Pirnay, J.-P., Verbeken, G., Rose, T., Jennes, M., Zizi, M., Huys, I., Lavigne, R., et al. (2012). Introducing yesterday’s phage therapy in today's medicine. FUTURE VIROLOGY, 7(4), 379–390.
Vancouver
1.
Pirnay J-P, Verbeken G, Rose T, Jennes M, Zizi M, Huys I, et al. Introducing yesterday’s phage therapy in today's medicine. FUTURE VIROLOGY. 2012;7(4):379–90.
MLA
Pirnay, Jean-Paul, Gilbert Verbeken, Thomas Rose, et al. “Introducing Yesterday’s Phage Therapy in Today's Medicine.” FUTURE VIROLOGY 7.4 (2012): 379–390. Print.