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Archeometry at the Department of Geography

Timothy Nuttens, Alain De Wulf UGent, Rudi Goossens UGent, Philippe De Maeyer UGent, Nico Van de Weghe UGent, Jan Nyssen UGent, Morgan De Dapper UGent, Veerle Van Eetvelde UGent and Marc Antrop UGent (2013) Non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites in Europe : a round-up. p.56-56
abstract
The department of Geography of Ghent University (Faculty of Sciences) acts as an important partner in a great number of archaeological projects. Each research group of the department is active in its own field of investigation and they work separately or together in many archaeological projects around the world. These research groups contribute to the measurement and recording of the sites, the understanding of geographical processes linked to these sites and their 2D, 3D or 4D visualizations. The Landscape Research and Physical Geography research groups contribute to the geomorphological and landscape analysis of archaeological sites. For landscape research, technologies such as remote sensing, GIS and landscape mapping are being used to make inventories, to study cultural values and landscape heritage, and to perform a historic landscape characterization, following a holistic approach. The Physical Geography research group focuses on the regional geomorphology, not only in Belgium but also in other parts of the world; the study of environmental changes and their impacts on geomorphological processes and the application of physical geography methodologies on archaeological sites. Together, both research groups contribute to the interpretation and environmental reconstruction of archaeological contexts, by performing field work and GI analyses. The archaeological related research activities of the 3D Data Acquisition group focus on spatial and terrestrial 3D data acquisition. The wide range of acquisition sensors, the study of their possible applications, the processing of the different types of 3D data and a thorough accuracy analysis are the main research activities. The remote sensing and photogrammetry research topics focus on different applications with satellite and aerial images obtained from different types of moving platforms (drones, helicopters, airplanes, satellites, etc.). A lot of these applications and projects are related to archaeology and the mapping of archaeological sites and their surroundings. For the acquisition of terrestrial data, the research group is working with various topographical and photogrammetric instruments: leveling instruments, (robotic) total stations, digital cameras for photogrammetric restitution and photo modelling, laser scanners, mobile mapping, GNSS receivers, etc. All these techniques are used for archaeological projects to provide accurate and detailed topographical maps of the area, digital terrain models, 3D models of archaeological objects or remains, orthophotos, 3D and 4D visualizations, etc. In the Cartography & GIS (CartoGIS) research group of the department, both fundamental and applied research on various aspects of cartography and geographical information science is conducted. With regard to archaeological projects, the research group is specialized in geographical information production, data infrastructure and the management of the geographical data. Moreover, the CartoGIS research group provides necessary 3D and 4D visualization tools for the geographical information and performs 3D/4D GIS modelling analyses and spatial temporal analyses for different archaeological projects. The different research groups in the Department of Geography (UGent) integrate different geomatics techniques for various archaeological sites and projects (Belgium; Calakmúl, Mexico; Urumqi, China; Titani, Greece; Eastern Islands; Egypt; Altaï Mountains; Malta among others). Besides the geomatics part, these integrated research activities also include geoarchaeological and geomorphological studies, GIS-based analyses and visualization tools.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
in
Non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites in Europe : a round-up
editor
Frank Vermeulen and Cristina Corsi
pages
56 - 56
conference name
Radio-Past colloquium : Non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites in Europe : a round-up
conference location
Ghent, Belgium
conference start
2013-01-15
conference end
2013-01-17
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
3134495
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3134495
date created
2013-02-18 15:43:02
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:37:07
@inproceedings{3134495,
  abstract     = {The department of Geography of Ghent University (Faculty of Sciences) acts as an important partner in a great number of archaeological projects. Each research group of the department is active in its own field of investigation and they work separately or together in many archaeological projects around the world.  These research groups contribute to the measurement and recording of the sites, the understanding of geographical processes linked to these sites and their 2D, 3D or 4D visualizations. 
The Landscape Research and Physical Geography research groups contribute to the geomorphological and landscape analysis of archaeological sites. For landscape research, technologies such as remote sensing, GIS and landscape mapping are being used to make inventories, to study cultural values and landscape heritage, and to perform a historic landscape characterization, following a holistic approach. The Physical Geography research group focuses on the regional geomorphology, not only in Belgium but also in other parts of the world; the study of environmental changes and their impacts on geomorphological processes and the application of physical geography methodologies on archaeological sites. Together, both research groups contribute to the interpretation and environmental reconstruction of archaeological contexts, by performing field work and GI analyses.
The archaeological related research activities of the 3D Data Acquisition group focus on spatial and terrestrial 3D data acquisition. The wide range of acquisition sensors, the study of their possible applications, the processing of the different types of 3D data and a thorough accuracy analysis are the main research activities. The remote sensing and photogrammetry research topics focus on different applications with satellite and aerial images obtained from different types of moving platforms (drones, helicopters, airplanes, satellites, etc.). A lot of these applications and projects are related to archaeology and the mapping of archaeological sites and their surroundings. For the acquisition of terrestrial data, the research group is working with various topographical and photogrammetric instruments: leveling instruments, (robotic) total stations, digital cameras for photogrammetric restitution and photo modelling, laser scanners, mobile mapping, GNSS receivers, etc. All these techniques are used for archaeological projects to provide accurate and detailed topographical maps of the area, digital terrain models, 3D models of archaeological objects or remains, orthophotos, 3D and 4D visualizations, etc.
In the Cartography \& GIS (CartoGIS) research group of the department, both fundamental and applied research on various aspects of cartography and geographical information science is conducted. With regard to archaeological projects, the research group is specialized in geographical information production, data infrastructure and the management of the geographical data. Moreover, the CartoGIS research group provides necessary 3D and 4D visualization tools for the geographical information and performs 3D/4D GIS modelling analyses and spatial temporal analyses for different archaeological projects. 
The different research groups in the Department of Geography (UGent) integrate different geomatics techniques for various archaeological sites and projects (Belgium; Calakm{\'u}l, Mexico; Urumqi, China; Titani, Greece; Eastern Islands; Egypt; Alta{\"i} Mountains; Malta among others). Besides the geomatics part, these integrated research activities also include geoarchaeological and geomorphological studies, GIS-based analyses and visualization tools.},
  author       = {Nuttens, Timothy and De Wulf, Alain and Goossens, Rudi and De Maeyer, Philippe and Van de Weghe, Nico and Nyssen, Jan and De Dapper, Morgan and Van Eetvelde, Veerle and Antrop, Marc},
  booktitle    = {Non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites in Europe : a round-up},
  editor       = {Vermeulen, Frank and Corsi, Cristina},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Ghent, Belgium},
  pages        = {56--56},
  title        = {Archeometry at the Department of Geography},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Nuttens, Timothy, Alain De Wulf, Rudi Goossens, Philippe De Maeyer, Nico Van de Weghe, Jan Nyssen, Morgan De Dapper, Veerle Van Eetvelde, and Marc Antrop. 2013. “Archeometry at the Department of Geography.” In Non-destructive Approaches to Complex Archaeological Sites in Europe : a Round-up, ed. Frank Vermeulen and Cristina Corsi, 56–56.
APA
Nuttens, T., De Wulf, A., Goossens, R., De Maeyer, P., Van de Weghe, N., Nyssen, J., De Dapper, M., et al. (2013). Archeometry at the Department of Geography. In Frank Vermeulen & C. Corsi (Eds.), Non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites in Europe : a round-up (pp. 56–56). Presented at the Radio-Past colloquium : Non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites in Europe : a round-up.
Vancouver
1.
Nuttens T, De Wulf A, Goossens R, De Maeyer P, Van de Weghe N, Nyssen J, et al. Archeometry at the Department of Geography. In: Vermeulen F, Corsi C, editors. Non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites in Europe : a round-up. 2013. p. 56–56.
MLA
Nuttens, Timothy, Alain De Wulf, Rudi Goossens, et al. “Archeometry at the Department of Geography.” Non-destructive Approaches to Complex Archaeological Sites in Europe : a Round-up. Ed. Frank Vermeulen & Cristina Corsi. 2013. 56–56. Print.