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Sculpting the sound: timbre-shapers in classical Hindustani chordophones

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Abstract
Chordophones of the contemporary classical Hindustani tradition are characterized by the presence of one or both of these two specific devices: the sympathetic strings taraf (from about 10 to over 30) and the curved wide bridge jawari (sometimes reinforced by a cotton thread). The influence of the taraf and jawari devices has been scarcely investigated, even though players consider both the taraf’s response and the jawari effect as fundamental to the instruments sound. Based on field recordings and interviews, this study aims to quantify the contribution of taraf strings and wide curved bridge jawari to the global sound of the different instruments and settings. Acoustical analyses are correlated with ethnomusicological analyses, in order to evaluate the tarafs and jawaris aesthetic, musical and perceptual role.

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Chicago
Demoucron, Matthias, Stéphanie Weisser, and Marc Leman. 2012. “Sculpting the Sound: Timbre-shapers in Classical Hindustani Chordophones.” In Proceedings of 2nd CompMusic Workshop, 85–92.
APA
Demoucron, M., Weisser, S., & Leman, M. (2012). Sculpting the sound: timbre-shapers in classical Hindustani chordophones. Proceedings of 2nd CompMusic Workshop (pp. 85–92). Presented at the 2nd CompMusic Workshop.
Vancouver
1.
Demoucron M, Weisser S, Leman M. Sculpting the sound: timbre-shapers in classical Hindustani chordophones. Proceedings of 2nd CompMusic Workshop. 2012. p. 85–92.
MLA
Demoucron, Matthias, Stéphanie Weisser, and Marc Leman. “Sculpting the Sound: Timbre-shapers in Classical Hindustani Chordophones.” Proceedings of 2nd CompMusic Workshop. 2012. 85–92. Print.
@inproceedings{3128580,
  abstract     = {Chordophones of the contemporary classical Hindustani tradition are characterized by the presence of one or both of these two specific devices: the sympathetic strings taraf (from about 10 to over 30) and the curved wide bridge jawari (sometimes reinforced by a cotton thread). The influence of the taraf and jawari devices has been scarcely investigated, even though players consider both the taraf{\textquoteright}s response and the jawari effect as fundamental to the instruments sound. Based on field recordings and interviews, this study aims to quantify the contribution of taraf strings and wide curved bridge jawari to the global sound of the different instruments and settings. Acoustical analyses are correlated with ethnomusicological analyses, in order to evaluate the tarafs and jawaris aesthetic, musical and perceptual role.},
  author       = {Demoucron, Matthias and Weisser, St{\'e}phanie and Leman, Marc},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of 2nd CompMusic Workshop},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Istanbul, Turkey},
  pages        = {85--92},
  title        = {Sculpting the sound: timbre-shapers in classical Hindustani chordophones},
  year         = {2012},
}