Advanced search
1 file | 302.41 KB

Longitudinal study of repeated sprint performance in youth soccer players of contrasting skeletal maturity status

Author
Organization
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to evaluate the developmental changes in performance in a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test in young soccer players of contrasting maturity status. A total of 83 regional level Portuguese youth soccer players, aged 11-13 years at baseline was assessed annually. Stature, body mass, 7x34.2-m sprint protocol (25-s active recovery), 20-m multi-stage continuous shuttle endurance run and counter-movement jump (CMJ) without the use of the arms were measured. Fat-free mass (FFM) was determined by age and gender-specific formulas. Developmental changes in total sprint time across ages were predicted using multilevel modeling. Corresponding measurements were performed on an independent cross-sectional sub-sample of 52 youth soccer players 11-17 years to evaluate the predictive model. CA, CA(2), maturational status (SA-CA), body size (mass and stature), FFM, aerobic endurance, lower limb explosive strength and annual volume training significantly improved the statistical fit of the RSA multilevel model. In 'late' maturing athletes, the best model for predicting change in RSA was expressed by the following equation: 86.54 - 2.87 x CA + 0.05 x CA(2) - 0.25 x FFM + 0.15 x body mass + 0.05 x stature - 0.05 x aerobic endurance - 0.09 x lower limb explosive strength - 0.01 x annual volume training. The best fitting models for players who were 'on time' and 'early' maturing were identical to the best model for late maturing players, less 0.64 seconds and 1.74 seconds, respectively. Multilevel modeling provided performance curves that permitted the prediction of individual RSA performance across adolescent years in regional level soccer players.
Keywords
RESPONSES, SKILL, young athletes, ABILITY, RUNNING PERFORMANCE, AGE VERIFICATION, MECHANICAL POWER, PROFESSIONAL SOCCER, ELITE SOCCER, PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE, AEROBIC FITNESS, short-term effort, multilevel modeling, maturation, growth

Downloads

  • Valente-dos-Santos longitudinal study of repeated sprint performance.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 302.41 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Valente-dos-Santos, João, Manuel J Coelho-e-Silva, Vitor Severino, João Duarte, Raúl S Martins, António J Figueiredo, André T Seabra, et al. 2012. “Longitudinal Study of Repeated Sprint Performance in Youth Soccer Players of Contrasting Skeletal Maturity Status.” Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 11 (3): 371–379.
APA
Valente-dos-Santos, João, Coelho-e-Silva, M. J., Severino, V., Duarte, J., Martins, R. S., Figueiredo, A. J., Seabra, A. T., et al. (2012). Longitudinal study of repeated sprint performance in youth soccer players of contrasting skeletal maturity status. JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE, 11(3), 371–379.
Vancouver
1.
Valente-dos-Santos J, Coelho-e-Silva MJ, Severino V, Duarte J, Martins RS, Figueiredo AJ, et al. Longitudinal study of repeated sprint performance in youth soccer players of contrasting skeletal maturity status. JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE. 2012;11(3):371–9.
MLA
Valente-dos-Santos, João, Manuel J Coelho-e-Silva, Vitor Severino, et al. “Longitudinal Study of Repeated Sprint Performance in Youth Soccer Players of Contrasting Skeletal Maturity Status.” JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE 11.3 (2012): 371–379. Print.
@article{3109779,
  abstract     = {The purpose of the study was to evaluate the developmental changes in performance in a repeated-sprint ability (RSA) test in young soccer players of contrasting maturity status. A total of 83 regional level Portuguese youth soccer players, aged 11-13 years at baseline was assessed annually. Stature, body mass, 7x34.2-m sprint protocol (25-s active recovery), 20-m multi-stage continuous shuttle endurance run and counter-movement jump (CMJ) without the use of the arms were measured. Fat-free mass (FFM) was determined by age and gender-specific formulas. Developmental changes in total sprint time across ages were predicted using multilevel modeling. Corresponding measurements were performed on an independent cross-sectional sub-sample of 52 youth soccer players 11-17 years to evaluate the predictive model. CA, CA(2), maturational status (SA-CA), body size (mass and stature), FFM, aerobic endurance, lower limb explosive strength and annual volume training significantly improved the statistical fit of the RSA multilevel model. In 'late' maturing athletes, the best model for predicting change in RSA was expressed by the following equation: 86.54 - 2.87 x CA + 0.05 x CA(2) - 0.25 x FFM + 0.15 x body mass + 0.05 x stature - 0.05 x aerobic endurance - 0.09 x lower limb explosive strength - 0.01 x annual volume training. The best fitting models for players who were 'on time' and 'early' maturing were identical to the best model for late maturing players, less 0.64 seconds and 1.74 seconds, respectively. Multilevel modeling provided performance curves that permitted the prediction of individual RSA performance across adolescent years in regional level soccer players.},
  author       = {Valente-dos-Santos, Jo{\~a}o and Coelho-e-Silva, Manuel J and Severino, Vitor and Duarte, Jo{\~a}o and Martins, Ra{\'u}l S and Figueiredo, Ant{\'o}nio J and Seabra, Andr{\'e} T and Philippaerts, Renaat and Cumming, Sean P and Elferink-Gemser, Marije and Malina, Robert M},
  issn         = {1303-2968},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SPORTS SCIENCE AND MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {RESPONSES,SKILL,young athletes,ABILITY,RUNNING PERFORMANCE,AGE VERIFICATION,MECHANICAL POWER,PROFESSIONAL SOCCER,ELITE SOCCER,PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE,AEROBIC FITNESS,short-term effort,multilevel modeling,maturation,growth},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {371--379},
  title        = {Longitudinal study of repeated sprint performance in youth soccer players of contrasting skeletal maturity status},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2012},
}

Web of Science
Times cited: