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Effect of beta-alanine and carnosine supplementation on muscle contractility in mice

Inge Everaert UGent, Sanne Stegen, Bert Vanheel UGent, Youri Taes and Wim Derave UGent (2013) MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE. 45(1). p.43-51
abstract
Purpose: Enhanced carnosine levels have been shown to be ergogenic for high-intensity exercise performances, although the role of carnosine in the control of muscle function is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term supplementation with increasing doses of carnosine and beta-alanine on muscle carnosine, anserine, and taurine levels and on in vitro contractility and fatigue in mice. Methods: Male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (n = 66) were control fed or supplemented with either carnosine (0.1%, 0.5%, or 1.8%) or beta-alanine (0.6 or 1.2%) in their drinking water for 8-12 wk. Soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were tested for in vitro contractile properties, and carnosine, anserine, and taurine content were measured in EDL and tibialis anterior by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Only supplementation with 1.8% carnosine and 1.2% beta-alanine resulted in markedly higher carnosine (up to +160%) and anserine levels (up to +46%) compared with control mice. Beta-alanine supplementation (1.2%) resulted in increased fatigue resistance in the beginning of the fatigue protocol in soleus (+2%-4%) and a marked leftward shift of the force-frequency relation in EDL (10%-31% higher relative forces). Conclusion: Comparable with humans, beta-alanine availability seems to be the rate-limiting step for synthesis of muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in mice. Moreover, muscle histidine-containing dipeptides loading in mice moderately and muscle dependently affects excitation-contraction coupling and fatigue.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SARCOPLASMIC-RETICULUM, PEPTIDES, MECHANISMS, METABOLISM, FATIGUE, HISTIDINE, PERFORMANCE, EXERCISE, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, CA-RELEASE CHANNELS, CALCIUM HANDLING, FORCE-FREQUENCY RELATION, FATIGUE RESISTANCE, ANSERINE
journal title
MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE
Med. Sci. Sports Exerc.
volume
45
issue
1
pages
43 - 51
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000312535200008
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
4.459 (2013)
JCR rank
5/81 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0195-9131
DOI
10.1249/MSS.0b013e31826cdb68
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3108209
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3108209
date created
2013-01-25 12:01:25
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:40:01
@article{3108209,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Enhanced carnosine levels have been shown to be ergogenic for high-intensity exercise performances, although the role of carnosine in the control of muscle function is poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term supplementation with increasing doses of carnosine and beta-alanine on muscle carnosine, anserine, and taurine levels and on in vitro contractility and fatigue in mice.
Methods: Male Naval Medical Research Institute mice (n = 66) were control fed or supplemented with either carnosine (0.1\%, 0.5\%, or 1.8\%) or beta-alanine (0.6 or 1.2\%) in their drinking water for 8-12 wk. Soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) were tested for in vitro contractile properties, and carnosine, anserine, and taurine content were measured in EDL and tibialis anterior by high-performance liquid chromatography.
Results: Only supplementation with 1.8\% carnosine and 1.2\% beta-alanine resulted in markedly higher carnosine (up to +160\%) and anserine levels (up to +46\%) compared with control mice. Beta-alanine supplementation (1.2\%) resulted in increased fatigue resistance in the beginning of the fatigue protocol in soleus (+2\%-4\%) and a marked leftward shift of the force-frequency relation in EDL (10\%-31\% higher relative forces).
Conclusion: Comparable with humans, beta-alanine availability seems to be the rate-limiting step for synthesis of muscle histidine-containing dipeptides in mice. Moreover, muscle histidine-containing dipeptides loading in mice moderately and muscle dependently affects excitation-contraction coupling and fatigue.},
  author       = {Everaert, Inge and Stegen, Sanne and Vanheel, Bert and Taes, Youri and Derave, Wim},
  issn         = {0195-9131},
  journal      = {MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE},
  keyword      = {SARCOPLASMIC-RETICULUM,PEPTIDES,MECHANISMS,METABOLISM,FATIGUE,HISTIDINE,PERFORMANCE,EXERCISE,SKELETAL-MUSCLE,CA-RELEASE CHANNELS,CALCIUM HANDLING,FORCE-FREQUENCY RELATION,FATIGUE RESISTANCE,ANSERINE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {43--51},
  title        = {Effect of beta-alanine and carnosine supplementation on muscle contractility in mice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e31826cdb68},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Everaert, Inge, Sanne Stegen, Bert Vanheel, Youri Taes, and Wim Derave. 2013. “Effect of Beta-alanine and Carnosine Supplementation on Muscle Contractility in Mice.” Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 45 (1): 43–51.
APA
Everaert, I., Stegen, S., Vanheel, B., Taes, Y., & Derave, W. (2013). Effect of beta-alanine and carnosine supplementation on muscle contractility in mice. MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE, 45(1), 43–51.
Vancouver
1.
Everaert I, Stegen S, Vanheel B, Taes Y, Derave W. Effect of beta-alanine and carnosine supplementation on muscle contractility in mice. MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE. 2013;45(1):43–51.
MLA
Everaert, Inge, Sanne Stegen, Bert Vanheel, et al. “Effect of Beta-alanine and Carnosine Supplementation on Muscle Contractility in Mice.” MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE 45.1 (2013): 43–51. Print.