Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Proprioception and muscle strength in subjects with a history of ankle sprains and chronic instability

Tine Willems UGent, Erik Witvrouw UGent, JAN VERSTUYFT UGent, Peter Vaes and Dirk De Clercq UGent (2002) JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING. 37(4). p.487-493
abstract
Objective: To examine if patients with chronic ankle instability or a history of ankle sprains without chronic instability have worse proprioception or less invertor and evertor muscle strength. Design and Setting: We assessed proprioception and muscle strength on the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer in the laboratory of the Department of Sports Medicine, University Hospital Ghent. Subjects: Subjects included 87 physical education students (44 men, 43 women, age = 18.33 +/- 1.25 years, mass = 66.09 +/- 8.11 kg, height = 174.11 +/- 8.57 cm) at the University of Ghent in Belgium. Their ankles were divided into 4 groups: a symptom-free control group, subjects with chronic ankle instability, subjects who had sustained an ankle sprain in the last 2 years without instability, and subjects who sustained an ankle sprain 3 to 5 years earlier without instability. Measurements: Active and passive joint-position sense was assessed at the ankle, and isokinetic peak torque was determined for concentric and eccentric eversion and inversion movements at the ankle. Results: Statistical analysis indicated significantly less accurate active position sense for the instability group compared with the control group at a position close to maximal inversion. The instability group also showed a significantly lower relative eversion muscle strength (% body weight). No significant differences were observed between the control group and the groups with past sprains without instability. Conclusions: We suggest that the possible cause of chronic ankle instability is a combination of diminished proprioception and evertor muscle weakness. Therefore, we emphasize proprioception and strength training in the rehabilitation program for ankle instability.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
joint position sense, isokinetic strength, ankle injury, rehabilitation, FUNCTIONAL INSTABILITY, JOINT POSITION, UNSTABLE ANKLE, INJURY RISK, PREVENTION, SENSE
journal title
JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING
J. Athl. Train.
volume
37
issue
4
pages
487 - 493
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000180364000017
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.028 (2002)
JCR rank
25/69 (2002)
JCR quartile
2 (2002)
ISSN
1062-6050
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
310564
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-310564
date created
2005-06-03 11:29:00
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:22:40
@article{310564,
  abstract     = {Objective: To examine if patients with chronic ankle instability or a history of ankle sprains without chronic instability have worse proprioception or less invertor and evertor muscle strength.
Design and Setting: We assessed proprioception and muscle strength on the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer in the laboratory of the Department of Sports Medicine, University Hospital Ghent.
Subjects: Subjects included 87 physical education students (44 men, 43 women, age = 18.33 +/- 1.25 years, mass = 66.09 +/- 8.11 kg, height = 174.11 +/- 8.57 cm) at the University of Ghent in Belgium. Their ankles were divided into 4 groups: a symptom-free control group, subjects with chronic ankle instability, subjects who had sustained an ankle sprain in the last 2 years without instability, and subjects who sustained an ankle sprain 3 to 5 years earlier without instability.
Measurements: Active and passive joint-position sense was assessed at the ankle, and isokinetic peak torque was determined for concentric and eccentric eversion and inversion movements at the ankle. Results: Statistical analysis indicated significantly less accurate active position sense for the instability group compared with the control group at a position close to maximal inversion. The instability group also showed a significantly lower relative eversion muscle strength (\% body weight). No significant differences were observed between the control group and the groups with past sprains without instability.
Conclusions: We suggest that the possible cause of chronic ankle instability is a combination of diminished proprioception and evertor muscle weakness. Therefore, we emphasize proprioception and strength training in the rehabilitation program for ankle instability.},
  author       = {Willems, Tine and Witvrouw, Erik and VERSTUYFT, JAN and Vaes, Peter and De Clercq, Dirk},
  issn         = {1062-6050},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING},
  keyword      = {joint position sense,isokinetic strength,ankle injury,rehabilitation,FUNCTIONAL INSTABILITY,JOINT POSITION,UNSTABLE ANKLE,INJURY RISK,PREVENTION,SENSE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {487--493},
  title        = {Proprioception and muscle strength in subjects with a history of ankle sprains and chronic instability},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2002},
}

Chicago
Willems, Tine, Erik Witvrouw, JAN VERSTUYFT, Peter Vaes, and Dirk De Clercq. 2002. “Proprioception and Muscle Strength in Subjects with a History of Ankle Sprains and Chronic Instability.” Journal of Athletic Training 37 (4): 487–493.
APA
Willems, Tine, Witvrouw, E., VERSTUYFT, J., Vaes, P., & De Clercq, D. (2002). Proprioception and muscle strength in subjects with a history of ankle sprains and chronic instability. JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING, 37(4), 487–493.
Vancouver
1.
Willems T, Witvrouw E, VERSTUYFT J, Vaes P, De Clercq D. Proprioception and muscle strength in subjects with a history of ankle sprains and chronic instability. JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING. 2002;37(4):487–93.
MLA
Willems, Tine, Erik Witvrouw, JAN VERSTUYFT, et al. “Proprioception and Muscle Strength in Subjects with a History of Ankle Sprains and Chronic Instability.” JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING 37.4 (2002): 487–493. Print.