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Caucasian children's fat mass: routine anthropometry v. air-displacement plethysmography

(2013) BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION. 109(8). p.1528-1537
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Abstract
The present paper will use fat mass percentage (FM%) obtained via BOD POD (R) air-displacement plethysmography (FMADP%) to examine the relative validity of (1) anthropometric measurements/indices and (2) of FM% assessed with equations (FMeq%) based on skinfold thickness and bioelectrical impedance (BIA). In 480 Belgian children (aged 5-11 years) weight, height, skinfold thickness (triceps and subscapular), body circumferences (mid-upper arm, waist and hip), foot-to-foot BIA (Tanita (R)) and FMADP% were measured. Anthropometric measurements and calculated indices were compared with FMADP%. Next, published equations were used to calculate FMeq% using impedance (equations of Tanita (R), Tyrrell, Shaefer and Deurenberg) or skinfold thickness (equations of Slaughter, Goran, Dezenberg and Deurenberg). Both indices and equations performed better in girls than in boys. For both sexes, the sum of skinfold thicknesses resulted in the highest correlation with FMADP%, followed by triceps skinfold, arm fat area and subscapular skinfold. In general, comparing FMeq% with FMADP% indicated mostly an age and sex effect, and an increasing underestimation but less dispersion with increasing FM%. The Tanita (R) impedance equation and the Deurenberg skinfold equation performed the best, although none of the used equations were interchangeable with FMADP%. In conclusion, the sum of triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness is recommended as marker of FM% in the absence of specialised technologies. Nevertheless, the higher workload, cost and survey management of an immobile device like the BOD POD (R) remains justified.
Keywords
Air-displacement plethysmography, Anthropometry, Bioelectrical impedance, Children, Skinfold thickness, BODY-COMPOSITION TECHNIQUES, X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY, BIOELECTRICAL-IMPEDANCE, SKINFOLD THICKNESS, CROSS-VALIDATION, ADOLESCENTS, PREDICTION, EQUATIONS, FATNESS, OBESITY

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Citation

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Chicago
Michels, Nathalie, Inge Huybrechts, Karin Bammann, Lauren Lissner, Luis Moreno, Maarten Peeters, Isabelle Sioen, BARBARA VANAELST, Krishna Vyncke, and Stefaan De Henauw. 2013. “Caucasian Children’s Fat Mass: Routine Anthropometry V. Air-displacement Plethysmography.” British Journal of Nutrition 109 (8): 1528–1537.
APA
Michels, N., Huybrechts, I., Bammann, K., Lissner, L., Moreno, L., Peeters, M., Sioen, I., et al. (2013). Caucasian children’s fat mass: routine anthropometry v. air-displacement plethysmography. BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, 109(8), 1528–1537.
Vancouver
1.
Michels N, Huybrechts I, Bammann K, Lissner L, Moreno L, Peeters M, et al. Caucasian children’s fat mass: routine anthropometry v. air-displacement plethysmography. BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION. 2013;109(8):1528–37.
MLA
Michels, Nathalie, Inge Huybrechts, Karin Bammann, et al. “Caucasian Children’s Fat Mass: Routine Anthropometry V. Air-displacement Plethysmography.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION 109.8 (2013): 1528–1537. Print.
@article{3099332,
  abstract     = {The present paper will use fat mass percentage (FM\%) obtained via BOD POD (R) air-displacement plethysmography (FMADP\%) to examine the relative validity of (1) anthropometric measurements/indices and (2) of FM\% assessed with equations (FMeq\%) based on skinfold thickness and bioelectrical impedance (BIA). In 480 Belgian children (aged 5-11 years) weight, height, skinfold thickness (triceps and subscapular), body circumferences (mid-upper arm, waist and hip), foot-to-foot BIA (Tanita (R)) and FMADP\% were measured. Anthropometric measurements and calculated indices were compared with FMADP\%. Next, published equations were used to calculate FMeq\% using impedance (equations of Tanita (R), Tyrrell, Shaefer and Deurenberg) or skinfold thickness (equations of Slaughter, Goran, Dezenberg and Deurenberg). Both indices and equations performed better in girls than in boys. For both sexes, the sum of skinfold thicknesses resulted in the highest correlation with FMADP\%, followed by triceps skinfold, arm fat area and subscapular skinfold. In general, comparing FMeq\% with FMADP\% indicated mostly an age and sex effect, and an increasing underestimation but less dispersion with increasing FM\%. The Tanita (R) impedance equation and the Deurenberg skinfold equation performed the best, although none of the used equations were interchangeable with FMADP\%. In conclusion, the sum of triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness is recommended as marker of FM\% in the absence of specialised technologies. Nevertheless, the higher workload, cost and survey management of an immobile device like the BOD POD (R) remains justified.},
  author       = {Michels, Nathalie and Huybrechts, Inge and Bammann, Karin and Lissner, Lauren and Moreno, Luis and Peeters, Maarten and Sioen, Isabelle and VANAELST, BARBARA and Vyncke, Krishna and De Henauw, Stefaan},
  issn         = {0007-1145},
  journal      = {BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1528--1537},
  title        = {Caucasian children's fat mass: routine anthropometry v. air-displacement plethysmography},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0007114512003303},
  volume       = {109},
  year         = {2013},
}

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