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The Hubris hypothesis: you can self-enhance, but you'd better not show it

(2012) JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY. 80(5). p.1237-1274
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Abstract
We tested whether and why observers dislike individuals who convey self-superiority through blatant social comparison (the hubris hypothesis). Participants read self-superiority claims (I am better than others; Experiments 17), noncomparative positive claims (I am good; Experiments 12, 4), self-equality claims (I am as good as others; Experiments 34, 6), temporally comparative self-superiority claims (I am better than I used to be; Experiment 5), other-superiority claims (S/he is better than others; Experiment 6), and self-superiority claims accompanied by persistent disclaimers (Experiment 7). They judged the claim and the claimant (Experiments 17) and made inferences about the claimant's self-view and view of others (Experiments 47) as well as the claimant's probable view of them (Experiment 7). Self-superiority claims elicited unfavorable evaluations relative to all other claims. Evaluation unfavorability was accounted for by the perception that the claimant implied a negative view of others (Experiments 46) and particularly of the observer (Experiment 7). Supporting the hubris hypothesis, participants disliked individuals who communicated self-superiority beliefs in an explicitly comparative manner. Self-superiority beliefs may provoke undesirable interpersonal consequences when they are explicitly communicated to others but not when they are disguised as noncomparative positive self-claims or self-improvement claims.
Keywords
POSITIVE ILLUSIONS, IMPRESSION-FORMATION, BENEFITS, MENTAL-HEALTH, COMPARATIVE OPTIMISM, MOTIVES, PERCEIVED SUPERIORITY, NARCISSISM, OTHERS, CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS

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Chicago
Hoorens, Vera, Mario Pandelaere, Frans Oldersma, and Constantine Sedikides. 2012. “The Hubris Hypothesis: You Can Self-enhance, but You’d Better Not Show It.” Journal of Personality 80 (5): 1237–1274.
APA
Hoorens, Vera, Pandelaere, M., Oldersma, F., & Sedikides, C. (2012). The Hubris hypothesis: you can self-enhance, but you’d better not show it. JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, 80(5), 1237–1274.
Vancouver
1.
Hoorens V, Pandelaere M, Oldersma F, Sedikides C. The Hubris hypothesis: you can self-enhance, but you’d better not show it. JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY. 2012;80(5):1237–74.
MLA
Hoorens, Vera, Mario Pandelaere, Frans Oldersma, et al. “The Hubris Hypothesis: You Can Self-enhance, but You’d Better Not Show It.” JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY 80.5 (2012): 1237–1274. Print.
@article{3098207,
  abstract     = {We tested whether and why observers dislike individuals who convey self-superiority through blatant social comparison (the hubris hypothesis). Participants read self-superiority claims (I am better than others; Experiments 17), noncomparative positive claims (I am good; Experiments 12, 4), self-equality claims (I am as good as others; Experiments 34, 6), temporally comparative self-superiority claims (I am better than I used to be; Experiment 5), other-superiority claims (S/he is better than others; Experiment 6), and self-superiority claims accompanied by persistent disclaimers (Experiment 7). They judged the claim and the claimant (Experiments 17) and made inferences about the claimant's self-view and view of others (Experiments 47) as well as the claimant's probable view of them (Experiment 7). Self-superiority claims elicited unfavorable evaluations relative to all other claims. Evaluation unfavorability was accounted for by the perception that the claimant implied a negative view of others (Experiments 46) and particularly of the observer (Experiment 7). Supporting the hubris hypothesis, participants disliked individuals who communicated self-superiority beliefs in an explicitly comparative manner. Self-superiority beliefs may provoke undesirable interpersonal consequences when they are explicitly communicated to others but not when they are disguised as noncomparative positive self-claims or self-improvement claims.},
  author       = {Hoorens, Vera and Pandelaere, Mario and Oldersma, Frans and Sedikides, Constantine},
  issn         = {0022-3506},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY},
  keywords     = {POSITIVE ILLUSIONS,IMPRESSION-FORMATION,BENEFITS,MENTAL-HEALTH,COMPARATIVE OPTIMISM,MOTIVES,PERCEIVED SUPERIORITY,NARCISSISM,OTHERS,CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1237--1274},
  title        = {The Hubris hypothesis: you can self-enhance, but you'd better not show it},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-6494.2011.00759.x},
  volume       = {80},
  year         = {2012},
}

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