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Timing of transition between capillaroscopic patterns in systemic sclerosis

Alberto Sulli, Carmen Pizzorni, Vanessa Smith UGent, Giuseppe Zampogna, Francesca Ravera and Maurizio Cutolo (2012) ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM. 64(3). p.821-825
abstract
Objective. To investigate the timing of transition through different patterns of nailfold microvascular damage in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Methods. In this medium-term longitudinal study, 38 SSc patients (median disease duration 12 months) with the early scleroderma pattern of microangiopathy seen on baseline nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) were followed up by NVC for a median of 84 months. The evolution of the NVC pattern over time was monitored and recorded. Results. At the end of followup, the NVC pattern was still that of early scleroderma in 47% of the patients. The active scleroderma pattern was seen in 34%, the late scleroderma pattern in 13%, and a normal pattern in 5%. The mean +/- SD time of progression from the early to the active pattern and from the early to the late pattern was of 28 +/- 20 months and 36 +/- 29 months, respectively. In the subgroup of patients whose microangiopathy progressed from the early to the late NVC pattern, the time of progression from the early to the active pattern was only 8 +/- 1 months (P = 0.01), demonstrating that there is a subset of patients with rapid progression of microangiopathy. Clinical symptoms progressed in accordance with the nailfold morphologic changes in 60% of the SSc patients. Conclusion. The results of this longitudinal study demonstrate dynamic transition of microvascular damage through different NVC patterns of microangiopathy in +/- 50% of SSc patients. It is recommended that patients exhibiting rapid progression from the early to the active NVC pattern (< 1 year) should be monitored closely, since the evidence suggests that they are at risk of rapid progression to the advanced (late) NVC pattern of microangiopathy that is associated with further clinical manifestations of SSc.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
NAILFOLD VIDEOCAPILLAROSCOPIC PATTERNS, RAYNAUDS-PHENOMENON, MICROVASCULAR CHANGES, SCLERODERMA, CRITERIA, AUTOANTIBODIES, ENDOTHELIN, DISEASE
journal title
ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM
Arthritis Rheum.
volume
64
issue
3
pages
821 - 825
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300835900026
JCR category
RHEUMATOLOGY
JCR impact factor
7.477 (2012)
JCR rank
3/29 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0004-3591
DOI
10.1002/art.33463
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3090174
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3090174
date created
2013-01-11 11:43:10
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:07
@article{3090174,
  abstract     = {Objective. To investigate the timing of transition through different patterns of nailfold microvascular damage in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). 
Methods. In this medium-term longitudinal study, 38 SSc patients (median disease duration 12 months) with the early scleroderma pattern of microangiopathy seen on baseline nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) were followed up by NVC for a median of 84 months. The evolution of the NVC pattern over time was monitored and recorded. 
Results. At the end of followup, the NVC pattern was still that of early scleroderma in 47\% of the patients. The active scleroderma pattern was seen in 34\%, the late scleroderma pattern in 13\%, and a normal pattern in 5\%. The mean +/- SD time of progression from the early to the active pattern and from the early to the late pattern was of 28 +/- 20 months and 36 +/- 29 months, respectively. In the subgroup of patients whose microangiopathy progressed from the early to the late NVC pattern, the time of progression from the early to the active pattern was only 8 +/- 1 months (P = 0.01), demonstrating that there is a subset of patients with rapid progression of microangiopathy. Clinical symptoms progressed in accordance with the nailfold morphologic changes in 60\% of the SSc patients. 
Conclusion. The results of this longitudinal study demonstrate dynamic transition of microvascular damage through different NVC patterns of microangiopathy in +/- 50\% of SSc patients. It is recommended that patients exhibiting rapid progression from the early to the active NVC pattern ({\textlangle} 1 year) should be monitored closely, since the evidence suggests that they are at risk of rapid progression to the advanced (late) NVC pattern of microangiopathy that is associated with further clinical manifestations of SSc.},
  author       = {Sulli, Alberto and Pizzorni, Carmen and Smith, Vanessa and Zampogna, Giuseppe and Ravera, Francesca and Cutolo, Maurizio},
  issn         = {0004-3591},
  journal      = {ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM},
  keyword      = {NAILFOLD VIDEOCAPILLAROSCOPIC PATTERNS,RAYNAUDS-PHENOMENON,MICROVASCULAR CHANGES,SCLERODERMA,CRITERIA,AUTOANTIBODIES,ENDOTHELIN,DISEASE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {821--825},
  title        = {Timing of transition between capillaroscopic patterns in systemic sclerosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/art.33463},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Sulli, Alberto, Carmen Pizzorni, Vanessa Smith, Giuseppe Zampogna, Francesca Ravera, and Maurizio Cutolo. 2012. “Timing of Transition Between Capillaroscopic Patterns in Systemic Sclerosis.” Arthritis and Rheumatism 64 (3): 821–825.
APA
Sulli, A., Pizzorni, C., Smith, V., Zampogna, G., Ravera, F., & Cutolo, M. (2012). Timing of transition between capillaroscopic patterns in systemic sclerosis. ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM, 64(3), 821–825.
Vancouver
1.
Sulli A, Pizzorni C, Smith V, Zampogna G, Ravera F, Cutolo M. Timing of transition between capillaroscopic patterns in systemic sclerosis. ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM. 2012;64(3):821–5.
MLA
Sulli, Alberto, Carmen Pizzorni, Vanessa Smith, et al. “Timing of Transition Between Capillaroscopic Patterns in Systemic Sclerosis.” ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM 64.3 (2012): 821–825. Print.