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Colon enemas for fecal incontinence in patients with spina bifida

Saskia Vande Velde (UGent) , Stephanie Van Biervliet (UGent) , Erik Van Laecke (UGent) , Ruth De Bruyne (UGent) , Helene Verhelst (UGent) , Piet Hoebeke (UGent) and Myriam Van Winckel (UGent)
(2013) JOURNAL OF UROLOGY. 189(1). p.300-304
Author
Organization
Abstract
Purpose: We studied the use of colon enemas in achieving fecal pseudocontinence in patients with spina bifida to define the variables associated with success. Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were individually filled out by all patients with spina bifida using colon enemas at our Spina Bifida Reference Center between October 2009 and June 2010. Patient age, type of enema, volume required, evacuation time, followup, continence and independence were recorded. Fecal pseudocontinence was defined as no involuntary stool loss during the last 6 months. Social continence was defined as involuntary stool loss less than once monthly. Children are routinely seen at the reference center, while adults are seen on request. Results: A total of 25 children and 15 adults with spina bifida were studied. Median volume required was 1 liter (range 0.5 to 2) in children and 1.5 liters (0.75 to 3) in adults. Median evacuation time was 30 minutes (range 15 to 60) in children and 60 minutes (30 to 120) in adults. Fecal continence was achieved in 76% of children (19 of 25) and 60% of adults (9 of 15), and social continence in 88% of children (23 of 25) and 67% of adults (10 of 15). A significant relation was found between medical followup since childhood and fecal pseudocontinence. No enema determinants predicted pseudocontinence. Conclusions: Colon enemas are a valuable method in achieving continence. At our center medical followup from childhood to adulthood is associated with successful acquisition of fecal pseudocontinence.
Keywords
spina bifida cystica, fecal incontinence, enema, ANTEGRADE CONTINENCE ENEMA, SACROCOCCYGEAL TERATOMA, BOWEL CONTINENCE, TAP WATER, MANAGEMENT, EXPERIENCE, PROGRAM, ADULTS

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MLA
Vande Velde, Saskia, Stephanie Van Biervliet, Erik Van Laecke, et al. “Colon Enemas for Fecal Incontinence in Patients with Spina Bifida.” JOURNAL OF UROLOGY 189.1 (2013): 300–304. Print.
APA
Vande Velde, Saskia, Van Biervliet, S., Van Laecke, E., De Bruyne, R., VERHELST, H., Hoebeke, P., & Van Winckel, M. (2013). Colon enemas for fecal incontinence in patients with spina bifida. JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, 189(1), 300–304.
Chicago author-date
Vande Velde, Saskia, Stephanie Van Biervliet, Erik Van Laecke, Ruth De Bruyne, HELENE VERHELST, Piet Hoebeke, and Myriam Van Winckel. 2013. “Colon Enemas for Fecal Incontinence in Patients with Spina Bifida.” Journal of Urology 189 (1): 300–304.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vande Velde, Saskia, Stephanie Van Biervliet, Erik Van Laecke, Ruth De Bruyne, HELENE VERHELST, Piet Hoebeke, and Myriam Van Winckel. 2013. “Colon Enemas for Fecal Incontinence in Patients with Spina Bifida.” Journal of Urology 189 (1): 300–304.
Vancouver
1.
Vande Velde S, Van Biervliet S, Van Laecke E, De Bruyne R, VERHELST H, Hoebeke P, et al. Colon enemas for fecal incontinence in patients with spina bifida. JOURNAL OF UROLOGY. 2013;189(1):300–4.
IEEE
[1]
S. Vande Velde et al., “Colon enemas for fecal incontinence in patients with spina bifida,” JOURNAL OF UROLOGY, vol. 189, no. 1, pp. 300–304, 2013.
@article{3081419,
  abstract     = {Purpose: We studied the use of colon enemas in achieving fecal pseudocontinence in patients with spina bifida to define the variables associated with success. 
Materials and Methods: Questionnaires were individually filled out by all patients with spina bifida using colon enemas at our Spina Bifida Reference Center between October 2009 and June 2010. Patient age, type of enema, volume required, evacuation time, followup, continence and independence were recorded. Fecal pseudocontinence was defined as no involuntary stool loss during the last 6 months. Social continence was defined as involuntary stool loss less than once monthly. Children are routinely seen at the reference center, while adults are seen on request. 
Results: A total of 25 children and 15 adults with spina bifida were studied. Median volume required was 1 liter (range 0.5 to 2) in children and 1.5 liters (0.75 to 3) in adults. Median evacuation time was 30 minutes (range 15 to 60) in children and 60 minutes (30 to 120) in adults. Fecal continence was achieved in 76% of children (19 of 25) and 60% of adults (9 of 15), and social continence in 88% of children (23 of 25) and 67% of adults (10 of 15). A significant relation was found between medical followup since childhood and fecal pseudocontinence. No enema determinants predicted pseudocontinence. 
Conclusions: Colon enemas are a valuable method in achieving continence. At our center medical followup from childhood to adulthood is associated with successful acquisition of fecal pseudocontinence.},
  author       = {Vande Velde, Saskia and Van Biervliet, Stephanie and Van Laecke, Erik and De Bruyne, Ruth and Verhelst, Helene and Hoebeke, Piet and Van Winckel, Myriam},
  issn         = {0022-5347},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF UROLOGY},
  keywords     = {spina bifida cystica,fecal incontinence,enema,ANTEGRADE CONTINENCE ENEMA,SACROCOCCYGEAL TERATOMA,BOWEL CONTINENCE,TAP WATER,MANAGEMENT,EXPERIENCE,PROGRAM,ADULTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {300--304},
  title        = {Colon enemas for fecal incontinence in patients with spina bifida},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.juro.2012.09.007},
  volume       = {189},
  year         = {2013},
}

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