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Model-assisted analysis of elevated temperature and vapour pressure deficit effects on tomato stem and fruit water balance

(2012) Acta Horticulturae. 957. p.37-44
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Abstract
Maintaining good plant water status is crucial for optimal production and quality of tomato in greenhouses. Various new climate control technologies have been introduced to make greenhouse cultivation more energy-efficient, resulting in a modified greenhouse climate. Recently, there has been growing interest in the use of plant-based methods to steer the climate. Monitoring stem diameter variations (SDV) has been extensively studied in tree species, but is also very promising for herbaceous crops. Stem and fruit diameter variations provide crucial information about plant water status, though unambiguous interpretation of these dynamics is often difficult. Mechanistic modelling can help to elucidate the mechanisms driving plant behaviour and is therefore an important tool for interpreting the dynamic response of the plants to changes in microclimate. In the present study, tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were subjected to elevated air temperature (Ta) and vapour pressure deficit (VPD), while SDV, sap flow and fruit growth were continuously monitored. Results indicated that stem shrinkage became more pronounced and fruits shrank during periods of high Ta and VPD. Simulation results showed that reduced fruit growth resulted from both increased fruit transpiration and decreased phloem inflow. Moreover, xylem backflow appeared when Ta and VPD reached maximum values. It was demonstrated that the reduced fruit growth resulted mainly from changes in stem water potential, rather than fruit water potential.
Keywords
transpiration, mechanistic modelling, stem diameter, Solanum lycopersicum, plant water status, water potential

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Citation

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Chicago
Hanssens, Jochen, Tom De Swaef, Lieve Wittemans, Kris Goen, Herman Marien, Johan Desmedt, and Kathy Steppe. 2012. “Model-assisted Analysis of Elevated Temperature and Vapour Pressure Deficit Effects on Tomato Stem and Fruit Water Balance.” In Acta Horticulturae, ed. Weihong Luo, Nadia Bertin, and Ep Heuvelink, 957:37–44. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
APA
Hanssens, Jochen, De Swaef, T., Wittemans, L., Goen, K., Marien, H., Desmedt, J., & Steppe, K. (2012). Model-assisted analysis of elevated temperature and vapour pressure deficit effects on tomato stem and fruit water balance. In W. Luo, N. Bertin, & E. Heuvelink (Eds.), Acta Horticulturae (Vol. 957, pp. 37–44). Presented at the 4th International symposium on Models for Plant Growth, Environmental Control and Farm Management in Protected Cultivation (HortiModel 2012), Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS).
Vancouver
1.
Hanssens J, De Swaef T, Wittemans L, Goen K, Marien H, Desmedt J, et al. Model-assisted analysis of elevated temperature and vapour pressure deficit effects on tomato stem and fruit water balance. In: Luo W, Bertin N, Heuvelink E, editors. Acta Horticulturae. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS); 2012. p. 37–44.
MLA
Hanssens, Jochen, Tom De Swaef, Lieve Wittemans, et al. “Model-assisted Analysis of Elevated Temperature and Vapour Pressure Deficit Effects on Tomato Stem and Fruit Water Balance.” Acta Horticulturae. Ed. Weihong Luo, Nadia Bertin, & Ep Heuvelink. Vol. 957. Leuven, Belgium: International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), 2012. 37–44. Print.
@inproceedings{3077390,
  abstract     = {Maintaining good plant water status is crucial for optimal production and quality of tomato in greenhouses. Various new climate control technologies have been introduced to make greenhouse cultivation more energy-efficient, resulting in a modified greenhouse climate. Recently, there has been growing interest in the use of plant-based methods to steer the climate. Monitoring stem diameter variations (SDV) has been extensively studied in tree species, but is also very promising for herbaceous crops. Stem and fruit diameter variations provide crucial information about plant water status, though unambiguous interpretation of these dynamics is often difficult. Mechanistic modelling can help to elucidate the mechanisms driving plant behaviour and is therefore an important tool for interpreting the dynamic response of the plants to changes in microclimate. In the present study, tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L.) were subjected to elevated air temperature (Ta) and vapour pressure deficit (VPD), while SDV, sap flow and fruit growth were continuously monitored. Results indicated that stem shrinkage became more pronounced and fruits shrank during periods of high Ta and VPD. Simulation results showed that reduced fruit growth resulted from both increased fruit transpiration and decreased phloem inflow. Moreover, xylem backflow appeared when Ta and VPD reached maximum values. It was demonstrated that the reduced fruit growth resulted mainly from changes in stem water potential, rather than fruit water potential.},
  author       = {Hanssens, Jochen and De Swaef, Tom and Wittemans, Lieve and Goen, Kris and Marien, Herman and Desmedt, Johan and Steppe, Kathy},
  booktitle    = {Acta Horticulturae},
  editor       = {Luo, Weihong and Bertin, Nadia and Heuvelink, Ep},
  isbn         = {9789066055155},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Nanjing, PR China},
  pages        = {37--44},
  publisher    = {International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS)},
  title        = {Model-assisted analysis of elevated temperature and vapour pressure deficit effects on tomato stem and fruit water balance},
  url          = {http://www.actahort.org/books/957/957\_3.htm},
  volume       = {957},
  year         = {2012},
}

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