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Imitation: is cognitive neuroscience solving the correspondence problem?

Marcel Brass (UGent) and C Heyes
(2005) TRENDS IN COGNITIVE SCIENCES. 9(10). p.489-495
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Abstract
Imitation poses a unique problem: how does the imitator know what pattern of motor activation will make their action look like that of the model? Specialist theories suggest that this correspondence problem has a unique solution; there are functional and neurological mechanisms dedicated to controlling imitation. Generalist theories propose that the problem is solved by general mechanisms of associative learning and action control. Recent research in cognitive neuroscience, stimulated by the discovery of mirror neurons, supports generalist solutions. Imitation is based on the automatic activation of motor representations by movement observation. These externally triggered motor representations are then used to reproduce the observed behaviour. This imitative capacity depends on learned perceptual-motor links. Finally, mechanisms distinguishing self from other are implicated in the inhibition of imitative behaviour.
Keywords
MECHANISMS, MIRROR, PERCEPTION, FMRI, BROCAS AREA, PET EXPLORATION, MOTOR FACILITATION, UTILIZATION BEHAVIOR, VENTRAL PREMOTOR CORTEX, HAND ACTIONS

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MLA
Brass, Marcel, and C Heyes. “Imitation: Is Cognitive Neuroscience Solving the Correspondence Problem?” TRENDS IN COGNITIVE SCIENCES 9.10 (2005): 489–495. Print.
APA
Brass, M., & Heyes, C. (2005). Imitation: is cognitive neuroscience solving the correspondence problem? TRENDS IN COGNITIVE SCIENCES, 9(10), 489–495.
Chicago author-date
Brass, Marcel, and C Heyes. 2005. “Imitation: Is Cognitive Neuroscience Solving the Correspondence Problem?” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10): 489–495.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Brass, Marcel, and C Heyes. 2005. “Imitation: Is Cognitive Neuroscience Solving the Correspondence Problem?” Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10): 489–495.
Vancouver
1.
Brass M, Heyes C. Imitation: is cognitive neuroscience solving the correspondence problem? TRENDS IN COGNITIVE SCIENCES. 2005;9(10):489–95.
IEEE
[1]
M. Brass and C. Heyes, “Imitation: is cognitive neuroscience solving the correspondence problem?,” TRENDS IN COGNITIVE SCIENCES, vol. 9, no. 10, pp. 489–495, 2005.
@article{3071176,
  abstract     = {Imitation poses a unique problem: how does the imitator know what pattern of motor activation will make their action look like that of the model? Specialist theories suggest that this correspondence problem has a unique solution; there are functional and neurological mechanisms dedicated to controlling imitation. Generalist theories propose that the problem is solved by general mechanisms of associative learning and action control. Recent research in cognitive neuroscience, stimulated by the discovery of mirror neurons, supports generalist solutions. Imitation is based on the automatic activation of motor representations by movement observation. These externally triggered motor representations are then used to reproduce the observed behaviour. This imitative capacity depends on learned perceptual-motor links. Finally, mechanisms distinguishing self from other are implicated in the inhibition of imitative behaviour.},
  author       = {Brass, Marcel and Heyes, C},
  issn         = {1364-6613},
  journal      = {TRENDS IN COGNITIVE SCIENCES},
  keywords     = {MECHANISMS,MIRROR,PERCEPTION,FMRI,BROCAS AREA,PET EXPLORATION,MOTOR FACILITATION,UTILIZATION BEHAVIOR,VENTRAL PREMOTOR CORTEX,HAND ACTIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {489--495},
  title        = {Imitation: is cognitive neuroscience solving the correspondence problem?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2005.08.007},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2005},
}

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