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Family- and school-based predictors of energy balance-related behaviours in children: a 6-year longitudinal study

Maïté Verloigne UGent, Wendy Van Lippevelde UGent, Lea Maes UGent, Johannes Brug and Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij UGent (2013) PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION. 16(2). p.202-211
abstract
Objective: To examine family- and school-based predictors of breakfast consumption, soft drink consumption and physical activity (PA) and moderating effects of gender and socio-economic status (SES). Design: Longitudinal study (6-year follow-up), including a questionnaire about dietary and activity behaviour. Setting: Fifty-nine Flemish elementary schools. Subjects: Seven hundred and twenty-seven children (51.9% girls, 51.9% high SES, mean age 9.9 (SD 0.4) years at baseline). Results: Having breakfast together with parents (P < 0.001) at age 10 years related to more days of eating breakfast at age 16 years. More parental soft drink consumption (P=0.04), less soft drink availability at home (P < 0.001) and less parental permissiveness (children received soft drinks from their parents whenever they asked for it and children could take soft drinks whenever they wanted; P=0.02 and P=0.001, respectively) at age 10 years related to less soft drink consumption at age 16 years. A more positive parental attitude towards PA (P=0.009), more parental encouragement (P=0.002) and a higher rating of PA's benefit 'relaxing' (P < 0.001) at age 10 years related to more PA at age 16 years. Gender and SES did not significantly moderate any of the associations. Conclusions: Only parental factors at age 10 years were associated with breakfast consumption, soft drink consumption and PA at age 16 years. An intervention programme at age 10 years with a strong focus on the modifiable parental factors might lead to healthy behaviour in the long term.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Predictors, Energy balance-related behaviours, Children, Family, School, YOUTH PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, BODY-MASS INDEX, SWEETENED BEVERAGES, NORTHERN-IRELAND, HEALTH BEHAVIOR, DIETARY HABITS, AGED CHILDREN, RISK-FACTORS, WEIGHT-GAIN, ADOLESCENTS
journal title
PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION
Public Health Nutr.
volume
16
issue
2
pages
202 - 211
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000313976100003
JCR category
PUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH
JCR impact factor
2.483 (2013)
JCR rank
45/162 (2013)
JCR quartile
2 (2013)
ISSN
1368-9800
DOI
10.1017/S1368980012004120
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3063269
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3063269
date created
2012-11-30 10:50:40
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:19:22
@article{3063269,
  abstract     = {Objective: To examine family- and school-based predictors of breakfast consumption, soft drink consumption and physical activity (PA) and moderating effects of gender and socio-economic status (SES). 
Design: Longitudinal study (6-year follow-up), including a questionnaire about dietary and activity behaviour. 
Setting: Fifty-nine Flemish elementary schools. 
Subjects: Seven hundred and twenty-seven children (51.9\% girls, 51.9\% high SES, mean age 9.9 (SD 0.4) years at baseline). 
Results: Having breakfast together with parents (P {\textlangle} 0.001) at age 10 years related to more days of eating breakfast at age 16 years. More parental soft drink consumption (P=0.04), less soft drink availability at home (P {\textlangle} 0.001) and less parental permissiveness (children received soft drinks from their parents whenever they asked for it and children could take soft drinks whenever they wanted; P=0.02 and P=0.001, respectively) at age 10 years related to less soft drink consumption at age 16 years. A more positive parental attitude towards PA (P=0.009), more parental encouragement (P=0.002) and a higher rating of PA's benefit 'relaxing' (P {\textlangle} 0.001) at age 10 years related to more PA at age 16 years. Gender and SES did not significantly moderate any of the associations. 
Conclusions: Only parental factors at age 10 years were associated with breakfast consumption, soft drink consumption and PA at age 16 years. An intervention programme at age 10 years with a strong focus on the modifiable parental factors might lead to healthy behaviour in the long term.},
  author       = {Verloigne, Ma{\"i}t{\'e} and Van Lippevelde, Wendy and Maes, Lea and Brug, Johannes and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse},
  issn         = {1368-9800},
  journal      = {PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION},
  keyword      = {Predictors,Energy balance-related behaviours,Children,Family,School,YOUTH PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY,BODY-MASS INDEX,SWEETENED BEVERAGES,NORTHERN-IRELAND,HEALTH BEHAVIOR,DIETARY HABITS,AGED CHILDREN,RISK-FACTORS,WEIGHT-GAIN,ADOLESCENTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {202--211},
  title        = {Family- and school-based predictors of energy balance-related behaviours in children: a 6-year longitudinal study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1368980012004120},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Verloigne, Maïté, Wendy Van Lippevelde, Lea Maes, Johannes Brug, and Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij. 2013. “Family- and School-based Predictors of Energy Balance-related Behaviours in Children: a 6-year Longitudinal Study.” Public Health Nutrition 16 (2): 202–211.
APA
Verloigne, M., Van Lippevelde, W., Maes, L., Brug, J., & De Bourdeaudhuij, I. (2013). Family- and school-based predictors of energy balance-related behaviours in children: a 6-year longitudinal study. PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION, 16(2), 202–211.
Vancouver
1.
Verloigne M, Van Lippevelde W, Maes L, Brug J, De Bourdeaudhuij I. Family- and school-based predictors of energy balance-related behaviours in children: a 6-year longitudinal study. PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION. 2013;16(2):202–11.
MLA
Verloigne, Maïté, Wendy Van Lippevelde, Lea Maes, et al. “Family- and School-based Predictors of Energy Balance-related Behaviours in Children: a 6-year Longitudinal Study.” PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION 16.2 (2013): 202–211. Print.