Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Impact of the slow cooking technique on the microbiological safety of foods

Evy Lahou, Liesbeth Jacxsens UGent, Evelien Carlier and Mieke Uyttendaele UGent (2012) Food Microbiology, 17th Conference, Abstracts. p.167-167
abstract
Introduction : New trends in the consumption and processing of food products may have an impact on the current and future microbial safety of food. One of those modern processing techniques is slow cooking of food products. However, little is known about the microbial safety of the food products processed in this way. Therefore microbial analysis were performed on food prepared according this slow cooking technique to estimate the health risk of this new cooking technique for consumers. Materials and Methods : Food products, namely spinach, tomatoes, poultry meat and poultry minced meat were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (LFMFP strain 482), Salmonella (LFMFP strain 688), Campylobacter jejuni (LFMFP strain 594) and E.coli O157:H7 (LFMFP strain 846) and prepared according the instructions of the Crock Pot® Sauté Countdown slow cooker (Model #SCV1600BS). The poultry meat products and the tomatoes were sampled every 30 minutes, while the spinach was sampled after every 15 min of preparation, till the food products were cooked thoroughly. Food samples were analysed on PCA, ALOA, XLD, CampyFood agar and Chromocult® Coliform Agar. Actual core (food) temperatures during preparation were measured with a MPIII temperature data logger (Senze Instruments, Battice, Belgium). Results : For the total count of poultry meat, enumerated on PCA, a logaritmic reduction of 4,8 log CFU/g was observed after 2h 30min preparation time, while this was a logaritmic reduction of 2,8 log CFU/g for poultry minced meat. For tomatoes a logaritmic reduction in total count of 1,4 log CFU/g was observed after 2h preparation and for spinach a logaritmic reduction of 3,2 log CFU/g was observed after 1h 30min. The pathogens L. monocytogenes, Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and E.coli O157:H7 could not be detected anymore in poultry meat, poultry minced meat and tomatoes after 1h 30min preparation time, while this was after 1h preparation time for spinach. The P70 value of 2 minutes, the time needed to kill the most resistant vegetative pathogen L. monocytogenes, was reached after 2h of preparing the poultry meat, the poultry minced meat and the tomatoes. The P-value for spinach was reached after 1h 30min. Conclusion : It was found that the time needed to cook the food products thoroughly was longer than the time needed to kill the present pathogens. Moreover, the P70 value of 2 minutes was reached before finishing the cooking time needed to cook the food thoroughly.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
slow cooking, food safety
in
Food Microbiology, 17th Conference, Abstracts
pages
167 - 167
publisher
Belgian Society for Food Microbiology (BSFM)
conference name
17th Conference on Food Microbiology
conference location
Brussels, Belgium
conference start
2012-09-20
conference end
2012-09-21
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C3
id
3057929
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3057929
date created
2012-11-22 11:57:35
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:37:39
@inproceedings{3057929,
  abstract     = {Introduction : New trends in the consumption and processing of food products may have an impact on the current and future microbial safety of food. One of those modern processing techniques is slow cooking of food products. However, little is known about the microbial safety of the food products processed in this way. Therefore microbial analysis were performed on food prepared according this slow cooking technique to estimate the health risk of this new cooking technique for consumers.
Materials and Methods : Food products, namely spinach, tomatoes, poultry meat and poultry minced meat were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (LFMFP strain 482), Salmonella (LFMFP strain 688), Campylobacter jejuni (LFMFP strain 594) and E.coli O157:H7 (LFMFP strain 846) and prepared according the instructions of the Crock Pot{\textregistered} Saut{\'e} Countdown slow cooker (Model \#SCV1600BS). The poultry meat products and the tomatoes were sampled every 30 minutes, while the spinach was sampled after every 15 min of preparation, till the food products were cooked thoroughly. Food samples were analysed on PCA, ALOA, XLD, CampyFood agar and Chromocult{\textregistered} Coliform Agar. Actual core (food) temperatures during preparation were measured with a MPIII temperature data logger (Senze Instruments, Battice, Belgium).
Results : For the total count of poultry meat, enumerated on PCA, a logaritmic reduction of 4,8 log CFU/g was observed after 2h 30min preparation time, while this was a logaritmic reduction of 2,8 log CFU/g for poultry minced meat. For tomatoes a logaritmic reduction in total count of 1,4 log CFU/g was observed after 2h preparation and for spinach a logaritmic reduction of 3,2 log CFU/g was observed after 1h 30min. The pathogens L. monocytogenes, Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni and E.coli O157:H7 could not be detected anymore in poultry meat, poultry minced meat and tomatoes after 1h 30min preparation time, while this was after 1h preparation time for spinach. The P70 value of 2 minutes, the time needed to kill the most resistant vegetative pathogen L. monocytogenes, was reached after 2h of preparing the poultry meat, the poultry minced meat and the tomatoes. The P-value for spinach was reached after 1h 30min.
Conclusion : It was found that the time needed to cook the food products thoroughly was longer than the time needed to kill the present pathogens. Moreover, the P70 value of 2 minutes was reached before finishing the cooking time needed to cook the food thoroughly.},
  author       = {Lahou, Evy and Jacxsens, Liesbeth and Carlier, Evelien and Uyttendaele, Mieke},
  booktitle    = {Food Microbiology, 17th Conference, Abstracts},
  keyword      = {slow cooking,food safety},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Brussels, Belgium},
  pages        = {167--167},
  publisher    = {Belgian Society for Food Microbiology (BSFM)},
  title        = {Impact of the slow cooking technique on the microbiological safety of foods},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Lahou, Evy, Liesbeth Jacxsens, Evelien Carlier, and Mieke Uyttendaele. 2012. “Impact of the Slow Cooking Technique on the Microbiological Safety of Foods.” In Food Microbiology, 17th Conference, Abstracts, 167–167. Belgian Society for Food Microbiology (BSFM).
APA
Lahou, E., Jacxsens, L., Carlier, E., & Uyttendaele, M. (2012). Impact of the slow cooking technique on the microbiological safety of foods. Food Microbiology, 17th Conference, Abstracts (pp. 167–167). Presented at the 17th Conference on Food Microbiology, Belgian Society for Food Microbiology (BSFM).
Vancouver
1.
Lahou E, Jacxsens L, Carlier E, Uyttendaele M. Impact of the slow cooking technique on the microbiological safety of foods. Food Microbiology, 17th Conference, Abstracts. Belgian Society for Food Microbiology (BSFM); 2012. p. 167–167.
MLA
Lahou, Evy, Liesbeth Jacxsens, Evelien Carlier, et al. “Impact of the Slow Cooking Technique on the Microbiological Safety of Foods.” Food Microbiology, 17th Conference, Abstracts. Belgian Society for Food Microbiology (BSFM), 2012. 167–167. Print.