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Compost amendment to sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity

Emmanuel Arthur UGent, Wim Cornelis UGent and Fatemeh Razzaghi (2012) COMPOST SCIENCE & UTILIZATION. 20(4). p.215-221
abstract
Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand and greenhouse tomato productivity. Disturbed and intact soil samples were taken from a decade-long compost field experiment on loamy sand with three compost types at application rate of 30 m3 ha-1 yr-1. The soils were characterized for chemical and physical properties. Tomato was planted in a greenhouse using soil samples from the field and vegetative and yield parameters (plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, and fruit yield), water productivity, and harvest index were evaluated. All compost types significantly increased soil total carbon, total nitrogen, pH, electrical conductivity and significantly decreased bulk density, with no effect on plant available water. Fresh and dry fruit weights were significantly increased after compost addition. Plant height, leaf number, stem diameter, and total biomass did not significantly improve after compost addition. Slight increases in water productivity and harvest index were also observed. Spent mushroom compost showed greater promise in improving tomato productivity. A decade-long application of composts on loamy sand improved basic chemical and physical properties which was reflected in increased fruit yield in tomato. Since no negative effect of compost was observed, we suggest that sandy soils may serve as a safe disposal option for these composts and potentially support crop growth.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Spent mushroom compost, loamy sand, bulk density, water productivity, plant biomass, PHYSICAL-PROPERTIES, CHEMICAL-PROPERTIES, SEEDLING GROWTH, ORGANIC-MATTER, FERTILIZER, QUALITY, YIELD, BIOSOLIDS, SYSTEM, IMPACT
journal title
COMPOST SCIENCE & UTILIZATION
Compost Sci. Util.
volume
20
issue
4
pages
215 - 221
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000312049900004
JCR category
SOIL SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
0.597 (2012)
JCR rank
29/34 (2012)
JCR quartile
4 (2012)
ISSN
1065-657X
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3057481
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3057481
date created
2012-11-21 17:58:18
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:43:35
@article{3057481,
  abstract     = {Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand and greenhouse tomato productivity. Disturbed and intact soil samples were taken from a decade-long compost field experiment on loamy sand with three compost types at application rate of 30 m3 ha-1 yr-1. The soils were characterized for chemical and physical properties. Tomato was planted in a greenhouse using soil samples from the field and vegetative and yield parameters (plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, and fruit yield), water productivity, and harvest index were evaluated. All compost types significantly increased soil total carbon, total nitrogen, pH, electrical conductivity and significantly decreased bulk density, with no effect on plant available water. Fresh and dry fruit weights were significantly increased after compost addition. Plant height, leaf number, stem diameter, and total biomass did not significantly improve after compost addition. Slight increases in water productivity and harvest index were also observed. Spent mushroom compost showed greater promise in improving tomato productivity. A decade-long application of composts on loamy sand improved basic chemical and physical properties which was reflected in increased fruit yield in tomato. Since no negative effect of compost was observed, we suggest that sandy soils may serve as a safe disposal option for these composts and potentially support crop growth.},
  author       = {Arthur, Emmanuel and Cornelis, Wim and Razzaghi, Fatemeh},
  issn         = {1065-657X},
  journal      = {COMPOST SCIENCE \& UTILIZATION},
  keyword      = {Spent mushroom compost,loamy sand,bulk density,water productivity,plant biomass,PHYSICAL-PROPERTIES,CHEMICAL-PROPERTIES,SEEDLING GROWTH,ORGANIC-MATTER,FERTILIZER,QUALITY,YIELD,BIOSOLIDS,SYSTEM,IMPACT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {215--221},
  title        = {Compost amendment to sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Arthur, Emmanuel, Wim Cornelis, and Fatemeh Razzaghi. 2012. “Compost Amendment to Sandy Soil Affects Soil Properties and Greenhouse Tomato Productivity.” Compost Science & Utilization 20 (4): 215–221.
APA
Arthur, E., Cornelis, W., & Razzaghi, F. (2012). Compost amendment to sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity. COMPOST SCIENCE & UTILIZATION, 20(4), 215–221.
Vancouver
1.
Arthur E, Cornelis W, Razzaghi F. Compost amendment to sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity. COMPOST SCIENCE & UTILIZATION. 2012;20(4):215–21.
MLA
Arthur, Emmanuel, Wim Cornelis, and Fatemeh Razzaghi. “Compost Amendment to Sandy Soil Affects Soil Properties and Greenhouse Tomato Productivity.” COMPOST SCIENCE & UTILIZATION 20.4 (2012): 215–221. Print.