Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

N2O and NO emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor: a simulation study

Stijn Van Hulle UGent, J Callens, Kris Mampaey UGent, Mark van Loosdrecht and Eveline Volcke UGent (2012) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY. 33(20). p.2281-2290
abstract
This contribution deals with NO and N2O emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor. Two possible model scenarios describing this emission by ammonium- oxidizing biomass have been compared in a simulation study of a granular sludge reactor for one-stage partial nitritation–Anammox. No significant difference between these two scenarios was noticed. The influence of the bulk oxygen concentration, granule size, reactor temperature and ammonium load on the NO and N2O emissions has been assessed. The simulation results indicate that emission maxima of NO and N2O coincide with the region for optimal Anammox conversion. Also, most of the NO and N2O are present in the off-gas, owing to the limited solubility of both gases. The size of granules needs to be large enough not to limit optimal Anammox activity, but not too large as this implies an elevated production of N2O. Temperature has a significant influence on N2O emission, as a higher temperature results in a better N-removal efficiency and a lowered N2O production. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there is a strong correlation between nitrite accumulation and N2O production. Further, three regions of operation can be distinguished: a region with high N2O, NO and nitrite concentration; a region with high N2 concentrations and, as such, high removal percentages; and a region with high oxygen and nitrate concentrations. There is some overlap between the first two regions, which is in line with the fact that maximum emission of NO and N2O coincides with the region for optimal Anammox conversion.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
nitric oxide, SEWAGE-TREATMENT, NITRIC-OXIDE, granular sludge, Anammox, ammonium oxidizing bacteria, nitrogen removal, nitrous oxide, WASTE-WATER, NITRIFICATION, ANAMMOX, TEMPERATURE, MODEL
journal title
ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY
Environ. Technol.
volume
33
issue
20
pages
2281 - 2290
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000310853400003
JCR category
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.606 (2012)
JCR rank
114/209 (2012)
JCR quartile
3 (2012)
ISSN
0959-3330
DOI
10.1080/09593330.2012.665492
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3054195
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3054195
date created
2012-11-19 09:46:06
date last changed
2013-07-12 11:13:47
@article{3054195,
  abstract     = {This contribution deals with NO and N2O emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor. Two possible model scenarios describing this emission by ammonium- oxidizing biomass have been compared in a simulation study of a granular sludge reactor for one-stage partial nitritation--Anammox. No significant difference between these two scenarios was noticed. The influence of the bulk oxygen concentration, granule size, reactor temperature and ammonium load on the NO and N2O emissions has been assessed. The simulation results indicate that emission maxima of NO and N2O coincide with the region for optimal Anammox conversion. Also, most of the NO and N2O are present in the off-gas, owing to the limited solubility of both gases. The size of granules needs to be large enough not to limit optimal Anammox activity, but not too large as this implies an elevated production of N2O. Temperature has a significant influence on N2O emission, as a higher temperature results in a better N-removal efficiency and a lowered N2O production. Statistical analysis of the results showed that there is a strong correlation between nitrite accumulation and N2O production. Further, three regions of operation can be distinguished: a region with high N2O, NO and nitrite concentration; a region with high N2 concentrations and, as such, high removal percentages; and a region with high oxygen and nitrate concentrations. There is some overlap between the first two regions, which is in line with the fact that maximum emission of NO and N2O coincides with the region for optimal Anammox conversion.},
  author       = {Van Hulle, Stijn and Callens, J and Mampaey, Kris and van Loosdrecht, Mark and Volcke, Eveline},
  issn         = {0959-3330},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY},
  keyword      = {nitric oxide,SEWAGE-TREATMENT,NITRIC-OXIDE,granular sludge,Anammox,ammonium oxidizing bacteria,nitrogen removal,nitrous oxide,WASTE-WATER,NITRIFICATION,ANAMMOX,TEMPERATURE,MODEL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {20},
  pages        = {2281--2290},
  title        = {N2O and NO emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor: a simulation study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09593330.2012.665492},
  volume       = {33},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Van Hulle, Stijn, J Callens, Kris Mampaey, Mark van Loosdrecht, and Eveline Volcke. 2012. “N2O and NO Emissions During Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in a Granular Sludge Reactor: a Simulation Study.” Environmental Technology 33 (20): 2281–2290.
APA
Van Hulle, Stijn, Callens, J., Mampaey, K., van Loosdrecht, M., & Volcke, E. (2012). N2O and NO emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor: a simulation study. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY, 33(20), 2281–2290.
Vancouver
1.
Van Hulle S, Callens J, Mampaey K, van Loosdrecht M, Volcke E. N2O and NO emissions during autotrophic nitrogen removal in a granular sludge reactor: a simulation study. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY. 2012;33(20):2281–90.
MLA
Van Hulle, Stijn, J Callens, Kris Mampaey, et al. “N2O and NO Emissions During Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal in a Granular Sludge Reactor: a Simulation Study.” ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 33.20 (2012): 2281–2290. Print.