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Op één nacht van Parijs: Oudenaarde als vestingstad op het slagveld van Europa, 1600-1859

Frederik Dhondt (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
The city of Oudenarde (East Flanders) occupied a strategic position on the Scheldt river in the County of Flanders. The present contribution is concerned with the French interest for Oudenarde under Louis XIV (1658-1708), one the one hand, and ends with the city's inclusion in the Wellington Barrier after the Battle of Waterloo (1815), on the other hand. Although Louis XIV transformed the urban organisation, through Vauban's overhaul of the Spanish fortifications, a new architectural style, two successful sieges and -a rare fact- a succesful defense by Vauban in 1674 against William of Orange, the French were not interested in Oudenarde in the long run. The city, situated ahead of the double "ceinture de fer" protecting the North of France, was abandoned at the Peace of Nijmegen (1678). Oudenarde was the theatre of a Europe-wide notorious battle in 1708, where a coalition-army under the Duke of Marlborough and Eugene of Savoy defeated Louis of Burgundy, Louis XIV's grandson, and the Duke of Vendôme, one of the outstanding French generals of the later Grand Siècle. The city, which still had the dominant Hights of Edalre uncovered, fell again -rather easily- for Louis XV during the War of the Austrian Succession. The construction of a fortress above the city (1822-1824) was destined to stop a new French thrust into present-day Belgium. Yet, due to a more peaceful 19th Century, its military capacities were never tested.
Keywords
East Flanders, International Relations, Spanish Netherlands, Austrian Netherlands, Military History, Early Modern History, Belgian History

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Dhondt, Frederik. “Op Één Nacht Van Parijs: Oudenaarde Als Vestingstad Op Het Slagveld Van Europa, 1600-1859.” Tijd Voor Oudenaarde. Ed. Paul Trio et al. Oudenaarde: MOU Museum, 2012. 64–77. Print.
APA
Dhondt, F. (2012). Op één nacht van Parijs: Oudenaarde als vestingstad op het slagveld van Europa, 1600-1859. In Paul Trio, R. Castelain, G. Van Kerkhoven, & M. De Smet (Eds.), Tijd voor Oudenaarde (pp. 64–77). Oudenaarde: MOU Museum.
Chicago author-date
Dhondt, Frederik. 2012. “Op Één Nacht Van Parijs: Oudenaarde Als Vestingstad Op Het Slagveld Van Europa, 1600-1859.” In Tijd Voor Oudenaarde, ed. Paul Trio, Rik Castelain, Geertrui Van Kerkhoven, and Marjan De Smet, 64–77. Oudenaarde: MOU Museum.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Dhondt, Frederik. 2012. “Op Één Nacht Van Parijs: Oudenaarde Als Vestingstad Op Het Slagveld Van Europa, 1600-1859.” In Tijd Voor Oudenaarde, ed. Paul Trio, Rik Castelain, Geertrui Van Kerkhoven, and Marjan De Smet, 64–77. Oudenaarde: MOU Museum.
Vancouver
1.
Dhondt F. Op één nacht van Parijs: Oudenaarde als vestingstad op het slagveld van Europa, 1600-1859. In: Trio P, Castelain R, Van Kerkhoven G, De Smet M, editors. Tijd voor Oudenaarde. Oudenaarde: MOU Museum; 2012. p. 64–77.
IEEE
[1]
F. Dhondt, “Op één nacht van Parijs: Oudenaarde als vestingstad op het slagveld van Europa, 1600-1859,” in Tijd voor Oudenaarde, P. Trio, R. Castelain, G. Van Kerkhoven, and M. De Smet, Eds. Oudenaarde: MOU Museum, 2012, pp. 64–77.
@incollection{3050701,
  abstract     = {The city of Oudenarde (East Flanders) occupied a strategic position on the Scheldt river in the County of Flanders. The present contribution is concerned with the French interest for Oudenarde under Louis XIV (1658-1708), one the one hand, and ends with the city's inclusion in the Wellington Barrier after the Battle of Waterloo (1815), on the other hand. Although Louis XIV transformed the urban organisation, through Vauban's overhaul of the Spanish fortifications, a new architectural style, two successful sieges and -a rare fact- a succesful defense by Vauban in 1674 against William of Orange, the French were not interested in Oudenarde in the long run. The city, situated ahead of the double "ceinture de fer" protecting the North of France, was abandoned at the Peace of Nijmegen (1678). Oudenarde was the theatre of a Europe-wide notorious battle in 1708, where a coalition-army under the Duke of Marlborough and Eugene of Savoy defeated Louis of Burgundy, Louis XIV's grandson, and the Duke of Vendôme, one of the outstanding French generals of the later Grand Siècle. The city, which still had the dominant Hights of Edalre uncovered, fell again -rather easily- for Louis XV during the War of the Austrian Succession. The construction of a fortress above the city (1822-1824) was destined to stop a new French thrust into present-day Belgium. Yet, due to a more peaceful 19th Century, its military capacities were never tested.},
  author       = {Dhondt, Frederik},
  booktitle    = {Tijd voor Oudenaarde},
  editor       = {Trio, Paul and Castelain, Rik and Van Kerkhoven, Geertrui and De Smet, Marjan},
  isbn         = {9789461900821},
  keywords     = {East Flanders,International Relations,Spanish Netherlands,Austrian Netherlands,Military History,Early Modern History,Belgian History},
  language     = {dut},
  pages        = {64--77},
  publisher    = {MOU Museum},
  title        = {Op één nacht van Parijs: Oudenaarde als vestingstad op het slagveld van Europa, 1600-1859},
  year         = {2012},
}