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Canopy uptake of 15NH₃ by four temperate tree species and the interaction with leaf properties

(2012) WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION. 223(9). p.5643-5657
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Biotechnology for a sustainable economy (Bio-Economy)
Abstract
Tree canopies are believed to act as a sink of atmospheric ammonia (NH3). However, few studies have compared the uptake efficiency of different tree species. This study assessed the uptake of 15N-labelled NH3 at 5, 20, 50 and 100 ppbv by leaves and twigs of potted silver birch, European beech, pedunculate oak and Scots pine saplings in June, August and September 2008. Additionally, foliar uptake of 13C-labelled carbon dioxide (13CO2) and leaf stomatal characteristics were determined per species and treatment date and the relation with 15NH3 uptake was assessed. Both 15NH3 and 13CO2 uptake were affected by tree species and treatment date, but only 15NH3 uptake was influenced by the applied NH3 concentration. Depending on the treatment date, 15NH3 uptake by leaves and twigs was highest at 5 (September), 20 (June) or 50 (August) ppb. Birch, beech and oak leaves showed the highest uptake in August, while for pine needles this was in June, and except at 5 ppb in June the 15NH3 uptake was always higher for the deciduous species than for pine. For all species except beech 13CO2 uptake was highest in August and on every treatment date the 13CO2 uptake by leaves of deciduous species was significantly higher than by pine needles. Leaf characteristics and 13CO2 uptake did not provide a strong explanation for the observed differences in 15NH3 uptake. This study shows that on the short term a high interspecific variability exists in NH3 uptake, which depends on the time in the growing season.
Keywords
MIXED CONIFEROUS FOREST, BIDIRECTIONAL AMMONIA EXCHANGE, nitrogen, deciduous, ammonia, stable isotopes, canopy uptake, coniferous, ATMOSPHERIC AMMONIA, NITROGEN DEPOSITION, DRY DEPOSITION, PHYSIOLOGICAL-PARAMETERS, COMPENSATION POINT, APOPLASTIC NH4+, LIGHT-INTENSITY, AIR HUMIDITY

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Citation

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Chicago
Adriaenssens, Sandy, Jeroen Staelens, Karen Wuyts, Shari Van Wittenberghe, Tatiana Wuytack, Kris Verheyen, Pascal Boeckx, and Roeland Samson. 2012. “Canopy Uptake of 15NH₃ by Four Temperate Tree Species and the Interaction with Leaf Properties.” Water Air and Soil Pollution 223 (9): 5643–5657.
APA
Adriaenssens, Sandy, Staelens, J., Wuyts, K., Van Wittenberghe, S., Wuytack, T., Verheyen, K., Boeckx, P., et al. (2012). Canopy uptake of 15NH₃ by four temperate tree species and the interaction with leaf properties. WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION, 223(9), 5643–5657.
Vancouver
1.
Adriaenssens S, Staelens J, Wuyts K, Van Wittenberghe S, Wuytack T, Verheyen K, et al. Canopy uptake of 15NH₃ by four temperate tree species and the interaction with leaf properties. WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION. 2012;223(9):5643–57.
MLA
Adriaenssens, Sandy, Jeroen Staelens, Karen Wuyts, et al. “Canopy Uptake of 15NH₃ by Four Temperate Tree Species and the Interaction with Leaf Properties.” WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION 223.9 (2012): 5643–5657. Print.
@article{3050291,
  abstract     = {Tree canopies are believed to act as a sink of atmospheric ammonia (NH3). However, few studies have compared the uptake efficiency of different tree species. This study assessed the uptake of 15N-labelled NH3 at 5, 20, 50 and 100 ppbv by leaves and twigs of potted silver birch, European beech, pedunculate oak and Scots pine saplings in June, August and September 2008. Additionally, foliar uptake of 13C-labelled carbon dioxide (13CO2) and leaf stomatal characteristics were determined per species and treatment date and the relation with 15NH3 uptake was assessed. Both 15NH3 and 13CO2 uptake were affected by tree species and treatment date, but only 15NH3 uptake was influenced by the applied NH3 concentration.  Depending on the treatment date, 15NH3 uptake by leaves and twigs was highest at 5 (September), 20 (June) or 50 (August) ppb. Birch, beech and oak leaves showed the highest uptake in August, while for pine needles this was in June, and except at 5 ppb in June the 15NH3 uptake was always higher for the deciduous species than for pine. For all species except beech 13CO2 uptake was highest in August and on every treatment date the 13CO2 uptake by leaves of deciduous species was significantly higher than by pine needles. Leaf characteristics and 13CO2 uptake did not provide a strong explanation for the observed differences in 15NH3 uptake. This study shows that on the short term a high interspecific variability exists in NH3 uptake, which depends on the time in the growing season.},
  author       = {Adriaenssens, Sandy and Staelens, Jeroen and Wuyts, Karen and Van Wittenberghe, Shari and Wuytack, Tatiana and Verheyen, Kris and Boeckx, Pascal and Samson, Roeland},
  issn         = {0049-6979},
  journal      = {WATER AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION},
  keyword      = {MIXED CONIFEROUS FOREST,BIDIRECTIONAL AMMONIA EXCHANGE,nitrogen,deciduous,ammonia,stable isotopes,canopy uptake,coniferous,ATMOSPHERIC AMMONIA,NITROGEN DEPOSITION,DRY DEPOSITION,PHYSIOLOGICAL-PARAMETERS,COMPENSATION POINT,APOPLASTIC NH4+,LIGHT-INTENSITY,AIR HUMIDITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {5643--5657},
  title        = {Canopy uptake of 15NH\unmatched{2083} by four temperate tree species and the interaction with leaf properties},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11270-012-1304-4},
  volume       = {223},
  year         = {2012},
}

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