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Feeling left out at sea? Navigating no ownership, customary rights and resource management

Robert Makgill UGent (2012) RESOURCE MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE. p.162-219
abstract
The principal intention of the paper is to describe and comment on the key components of the Marine Coastal Area Act 2011 (“MCAA”) with regard to the commons, customary rights and decision making under the Resource Management Act 1991. During the process of the Marine and Coastal Area Bill through Parliament the author acted for Local Government New Zealand (“LGNZ”). The author advised on policy and legislative review, consultation with the Ministry of Justice and other Crown departments, and submissions to the Maori Affairs Select Committee. Our firm has also acted for local authorities in respect of a number of treaty settlements. Much of the work we have undertaken focuses on the implications of the MCAA, and other proposed settlement legislation, on issues of public interest and local government decision making. In this context the paper finishes by considering first the implications of the MCAA for other marine and coastal area users; secondly a hypothetical case study in which customary rights are implemented; and thirdly the potential influence the MCAA will have on local government decision-making and public participation under future settlement legislation.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE
Resour. manag. theory pract.
pages
162 - 219
ISSN
1177-1003
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3035652
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3035652
date created
2012-10-28 02:39:52
date last changed
2012-11-08 14:27:14
@article{3035652,
  abstract     = {The principal intention of the paper is to describe and comment on the key components of the Marine Coastal Area Act 2011 ({\textquotedblleft}MCAA{\textquotedblright}) with regard to the commons, customary rights and decision making under the Resource Management Act 1991. During the process of the Marine and Coastal Area Bill through Parliament the author acted for Local Government New Zealand ({\textquotedblleft}LGNZ{\textquotedblright}). The author advised on policy and legislative review, consultation with the Ministry of Justice and other Crown departments, and submissions to the Maori Affairs Select Committee. Our firm has also acted for local authorities in respect of a number of treaty settlements. Much of the work we have undertaken focuses on the implications of the MCAA, and other proposed settlement legislation, on issues of public interest and local government decision making. In this context the paper finishes by considering first the implications of the MCAA for other marine and coastal area users; secondly a hypothetical case study in which customary rights are implemented; and thirdly the potential influence the MCAA will have on local government decision-making and public participation under future settlement legislation.},
  author       = {Makgill, Robert},
  issn         = {1177-1003},
  journal      = {RESOURCE MANAGEMENT THEORY \& PRACTICE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {162--219},
  title        = {Feeling left out at sea? Navigating no ownership, customary rights and resource management},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Makgill, Robert. 2012. “Feeling Left Out at Sea? Navigating No Ownership, Customary Rights and Resource Management.” Resource Management Theory & Practice: 162–219.
APA
Makgill, R. (2012). Feeling left out at sea? Navigating no ownership, customary rights and resource management. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE, 162–219.
Vancouver
1.
Makgill R. Feeling left out at sea? Navigating no ownership, customary rights and resource management. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE. 2012;162–219.
MLA
Makgill, Robert. “Feeling Left Out at Sea? Navigating No Ownership, Customary Rights and Resource Management.” RESOURCE MANAGEMENT THEORY & PRACTICE (2012): 162–219. Print.