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Tinnitus severity and its association with cognitive and somatic anxiety: a critical study

Els Ooms UGent, Stijn Vanheule UGent, Reitske Meganck UGent, Bart Vinck UGent, Jean-Baptiste Watelet UGent and Ingeborg Dhooge UGent (2012) EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY. 269(11). p.2327-2333
abstract
Tinnitus has been defined as a phantom auditory perception. Research indicates the necessity to make a distinction between the physical symptom and the subjective severity of the tinnitus symptom, since especially the latter seems to vary among patients. The relationship between tinnitus severity and psychological variables has been well established. Anxiety is considered to be an important variable for understanding the differences in the subjective tinnitus severity. Although many studies confirm the relationship between anxiety and tinnitus severity, most studies do not take the possibility of shared method variance and content overlap between questionnaires into account. Furthermore, anxiety is a broad concept and contains both a cognitive and somatic dimension. Research including both dimensions of anxiety in tinnitus population is rare. According to us two conditions must be fulfilled before theorization on the relation is useful: (1) the presence of clinically relevant cognitive and/or somatic anxiety, (2) evidence of a substantial or "real" relationship. In our sample, almost 60% reported more than average cognitive anxiety and 40.8% reported clinical relevant somatic anxiety. After controlling for content overlap between the questionnaires used, the relation between tinnitus severity and cognitive and somatic anxiety remains significant. Two hypothetical models concerning this relationship that deserve future research attention are described.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HANDICAP INVENTORY, HOSPITAL ANXIETY, DEPRESSION SCALE, RELIABILITY, DISORDERS, VALIDITY, Tinnitus, Cognitive anxiety, Somatic anxiety, Shared method variance, Content overlap
journal title
EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY
Eur. Arch. Oto-Rhino-Laryn.
volume
269
issue
11
pages
2327 - 2333
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000309676100004
JCR category
OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.458 (2012)
JCR rank
18/43 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0937-4477
DOI
10.1007/s00405-011-1887-1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3034323
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3034323
date created
2012-10-25 13:23:11
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:40:59
@article{3034323,
  abstract     = {Tinnitus has been defined as a phantom auditory perception. Research indicates the necessity to make a distinction between the physical symptom and the subjective severity of the tinnitus symptom, since especially the latter seems to vary among patients. The relationship between tinnitus severity and psychological variables has been well established. Anxiety is considered to be an important variable for understanding the differences in the subjective tinnitus severity. Although many studies confirm the relationship between anxiety and tinnitus severity, most studies do not take the possibility of shared method variance and content overlap between questionnaires into account. Furthermore, anxiety is a broad concept and contains both a cognitive and somatic dimension. Research including both dimensions of anxiety in tinnitus population is rare. According to us two conditions must be fulfilled before theorization on the relation is useful: (1) the presence of clinically relevant cognitive and/or somatic anxiety, (2) evidence of a substantial or {\textacutedbl}real{\textacutedbl} relationship. In our sample, almost 60\% reported more than average cognitive anxiety and 40.8\% reported clinical relevant somatic anxiety. After controlling for content overlap between the questionnaires used, the relation between tinnitus severity and cognitive and somatic anxiety remains significant. Two hypothetical models concerning this relationship that deserve future research attention are described.},
  author       = {Ooms, Els and Vanheule, Stijn and Meganck, Reitske and Vinck, Bart and Watelet, Jean-Baptiste and Dhooge, Ingeborg},
  issn         = {0937-4477},
  journal      = {EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY},
  keyword      = {HANDICAP INVENTORY,HOSPITAL ANXIETY,DEPRESSION SCALE,RELIABILITY,DISORDERS,VALIDITY,Tinnitus,Cognitive anxiety,Somatic anxiety,Shared method variance,Content overlap},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2327--2333},
  title        = {Tinnitus severity and its association with cognitive and somatic anxiety: a critical study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00405-011-1887-1},
  volume       = {269},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Ooms, Els, Stijn Vanheule, Reitske Meganck, Bart Vinck, Jean-Baptiste Watelet, and Ingeborg Dhooge. 2012. “Tinnitus Severity and Its Association with Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety: a Critical Study.” European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology 269 (11): 2327–2333.
APA
Ooms, E., Vanheule, S., Meganck, R., Vinck, B., Watelet, J.-B., & Dhooge, I. (2012). Tinnitus severity and its association with cognitive and somatic anxiety: a critical study. EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY, 269(11), 2327–2333.
Vancouver
1.
Ooms E, Vanheule S, Meganck R, Vinck B, Watelet J-B, Dhooge I. Tinnitus severity and its association with cognitive and somatic anxiety: a critical study. EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY. 2012;269(11):2327–33.
MLA
Ooms, Els, Stijn Vanheule, Reitske Meganck, et al. “Tinnitus Severity and Its Association with Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety: a Critical Study.” EUROPEAN ARCHIVES OF OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY 269.11 (2012): 2327–2333. Print.