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Time dependence of spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals

Jeroen Beeckman UGent and Kristiaan Neyts UGent (2012) Nematicons : spatial optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals. In Wiley Series in Pure and Applied Optics p.327-344
abstract
Although quite a number of applications of spatial solitons can be envisaged, the main application is their use as a dynamic optical interconnection. Depending on the speed at which the optical interconnection can be redirected from one output to another, different possibilities arise. If the switching time is in the order of a second, then typically only reconfigurable interconnects are possible, e.g. protective switching (when one optical path fails, the optical signal is switched to a backup optical path). More interesting is the use as high speed optical modulators, but then typically switching times in the order of a nanosecond are necessary. It is clear that the switching speed will be determinant for which application solitons can be of practical use, but in general one can state: the faster the switching speed, the better. In this Chapter, when we speak about switching time, we refer to the time that it takes for the soliton to form when the optical beam is switched on. For applications as reconfigurable interconnects, the switching time is actually the time it takes to switch the optical signal from one output to another, but since this is much harder to describe theoretically, we stick to the simpler problem of switching on (or off) the soliton beam. Obviously, the temporal behavior of the soliton will be determined by the optical nonlinearity used for the soliton formation and different nonlinearities are important in liquid crystals with completely different typical timescales. Therefore, in the first part of this Chapter we will give an overview of the behavior of the two most important optical nonlinearities in liquid crystals, namely the reorientational and the thermal nonlinearity. The other nonlinearities will be summarized briefly. In the second part, results for the soliton formation time will be presented for the reorientational nonlinearity.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
bookChapter
publication status
published
subject
book title
Nematicons : spatial optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals
editor
Gaetano Assanto
series title
Wiley Series in Pure and Applied Optics
pages
327 - 344
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
place of publication
Hoboken, New Jersey
ISBN
9780470907245
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
B2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
VABB id
c:vabb:339887
VABB type
VABB-4
id
3033674
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3033674
alternative location
http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-047090724X.html
date created
2012-10-24 11:11:52
date last changed
2012-10-25 10:29:35
@incollection{3033674,
  abstract     = {Although quite a number of applications of spatial solitons can be envisaged, the main application is their use as a dynamic optical interconnection. Depending on the speed at which the optical interconnection can be redirected from one output to another, different possibilities arise. If the switching time is in the order of a second, then typically only reconfigurable interconnects are possible, e.g. protective switching (when one optical path fails, the optical signal is switched to a backup optical path). More interesting is the use as high speed optical modulators, but then typically switching times in the order of a nanosecond are necessary. It is clear that the switching speed will be determinant for which application solitons can be of practical use, but in general one can state: the faster the switching speed, the better. In this Chapter, when we speak about switching time, we refer to the time that it takes for the soliton to form when the optical beam is switched on. For applications as reconfigurable interconnects, the switching time is actually the time it takes to switch the optical signal from one output to another, but since this is much harder to describe theoretically, we stick to the simpler problem of switching on (or off) the soliton beam. Obviously, the temporal behavior of the soliton will be  determined by the optical nonlinearity used for the soliton formation and different nonlinearities are important in liquid crystals with completely different typical timescales. Therefore, in the first part of this Chapter we will give an overview of the behavior of the two most important optical nonlinearities in liquid crystals, namely the reorientational and the thermal nonlinearity. The other nonlinearities will be summarized briefly. In the second part, results for the soliton formation time will be presented for the reorientational nonlinearity.},
  author       = {Beeckman, Jeroen and Neyts, Kristiaan},
  booktitle    = {Nematicons : spatial optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals},
  editor       = {Assanto, Gaetano},
  isbn         = {9780470907245},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {327--344},
  publisher    = {John Wiley \& Sons},
  series       = {Wiley Series in Pure and Applied Optics},
  title        = {Time dependence of spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals},
  url          = {http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-047090724X.html},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Beeckman, Jeroen, and Kristiaan Neyts. 2012. “Time Dependence of Spatial Solitons in Nematic Liquid Crystals.” In Nematicons : Spatial Optical Solitons in Nematic Liquid Crystals, ed. Gaetano Assanto, 327–344. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.
APA
Beeckman, J., & Neyts, K. (2012). Time dependence of spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals. In G. Assanto (Ed.), Nematicons : spatial optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals (pp. 327–344). Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons.
Vancouver
1.
Beeckman J, Neyts K. Time dependence of spatial solitons in nematic liquid crystals. In: Assanto G, editor. Nematicons : spatial optical solitons in nematic liquid crystals. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons; 2012. p. 327–44.
MLA
Beeckman, Jeroen, and Kristiaan Neyts. “Time Dependence of Spatial Solitons in Nematic Liquid Crystals.” Nematicons : Spatial Optical Solitons in Nematic Liquid Crystals. Ed. Gaetano Assanto. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons, 2012. 327–344. Print.