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Positive emotion broadens attention focus through decreased position-specific spatial encoding in early visual cortex: evidence from ERPs

Naomi Vanlessen UGent, Valentina Rossi UGent, Rudi De Raedt UGent and Gilles Pourtois UGent (2013) COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE. 13(1). p.60-79
abstract
Recent evidence has suggested that not only stimulus-specific attributes or top-down expectations can modulate attention selection processes, but also the actual mood state of the participant. In this study, we tested the prediction that the induction of positive mood can dynamically influence attention allocation and, in turn, modulate early stimulus sensory processing in primary visual cortex (V1). High-density visual event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants performed a demanding task at fixation and were presented with peripheral irrelevant visual textures, whose position was systematically varied in the upper visual field (close, medium, or far relative to fixation). Either a neutral or a positive mood was reliably induced and maintained throughout the experimental session. The ERP results showed that the earliest retinotopic component following stimulus onset (C1) strongly varied in topography as a function of the position of the peripheral distractor, in agreement with a near-far spatial gradient. However, this effect was altered for participants in a positive relative to a neutral mood. On the contrary, positive mood did not modulate attention allocation for the central (task-relevant) stimuli, as reflected by the P300 component. We ran a control behavioral experiment confirming that positive emotion selectively impaired attention allocation to the peripheral distractors. These results suggest a mood-dependent tuning of position-specific encoding in V1 rapidly following stimulus onset. We discuss these results against the dominant broaden-and-build theory.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Positive emotion, ERP, C1, Attention, Inhibition, Selectivity, Mood induction, COGNITIVE CONTROL, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, TIME-COURSE, NEGATIVE AFFECT, FEARFUL FACES, SPATIOTEMPORAL DYNAMICS, ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX, INTEGRATIVE THEORY, EVOKED-POTENTIALS, AFFECT INCREASES
journal title
COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
Cogn. Affect. Behav. Neurosci.
volume
13
issue
1
pages
60 - 79
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000314058400005
JCR category
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
3.209 (2013)
JCR rank
17/49 (2013)
JCR quartile
2 (2013)
ISSN
1530-7026
DOI
10.3758/s13415-012-0130-x
project
The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3032050
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3032050
date created
2012-10-19 17:06:38
date last changed
2013-04-15 10:05:16
@article{3032050,
  abstract     = {Recent evidence has suggested that not only stimulus-specific attributes or top-down expectations can modulate attention selection processes, but also the actual mood state of the participant. In this study, we tested the prediction that the induction of positive mood can dynamically influence attention allocation and, in turn, modulate early stimulus sensory processing in primary visual cortex (V1). High-density visual event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants performed a demanding task at fixation and were presented with peripheral irrelevant visual textures, whose position was systematically varied in the upper visual field (close, medium, or far relative to fixation). Either a neutral or a positive mood was reliably induced and maintained throughout the experimental session. The ERP results showed that the earliest retinotopic component following stimulus onset (C1) strongly varied in topography as a function of the position of the peripheral distractor, in agreement with a near-far spatial gradient. However, this effect was altered for participants in a positive relative to a neutral mood. On the contrary, positive mood did not modulate attention allocation for the central (task-relevant) stimuli, as reflected by the P300 component. We ran a control behavioral experiment confirming that positive emotion selectively impaired attention allocation to the peripheral distractors. These results suggest a mood-dependent tuning of position-specific encoding in V1 rapidly following stimulus onset. We discuss these results against the dominant broaden-and-build theory.},
  author       = {Vanlessen, Naomi and Rossi, Valentina and De Raedt, Rudi and Pourtois, Gilles},
  issn         = {1530-7026},
  journal      = {COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE \& BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE},
  keyword      = {Positive emotion,ERP,C1,Attention,Inhibition,Selectivity,Mood induction,COGNITIVE CONTROL,SELECTIVE ATTENTION,TIME-COURSE,NEGATIVE AFFECT,FEARFUL FACES,SPATIOTEMPORAL DYNAMICS,ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX,INTEGRATIVE THEORY,EVOKED-POTENTIALS,AFFECT INCREASES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {60--79},
  title        = {Positive emotion broadens attention focus through decreased position-specific spatial encoding in early visual cortex: evidence from ERPs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13415-012-0130-x},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Vanlessen, Naomi, Valentina Rossi, Rudi De Raedt, and Gilles Pourtois. 2013. “Positive Emotion Broadens Attention Focus Through Decreased Position-specific Spatial Encoding in Early Visual Cortex: Evidence from ERPs.” Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience 13 (1): 60–79.
APA
Vanlessen, N., Rossi, V., De Raedt, R., & Pourtois, G. (2013). Positive emotion broadens attention focus through decreased position-specific spatial encoding in early visual cortex: evidence from ERPs. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE, 13(1), 60–79.
Vancouver
1.
Vanlessen N, Rossi V, De Raedt R, Pourtois G. Positive emotion broadens attention focus through decreased position-specific spatial encoding in early visual cortex: evidence from ERPs. COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE. 2013;13(1):60–79.
MLA
Vanlessen, Naomi, Valentina Rossi, Rudi De Raedt, et al. “Positive Emotion Broadens Attention Focus Through Decreased Position-specific Spatial Encoding in Early Visual Cortex: Evidence from ERPs.” COGNITIVE AFFECTIVE & BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE 13.1 (2013): 60–79. Print.