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The syntax of the periphrastic progressive in the Septuagint and the New Testament

Klaas Bentein UGent (2013) NOVUM TESTAMENTUM. 55(2). p.168-192
abstract
In this article, I discuss the use of the periphrastic progressive construction of εἰμί "be" with present participle in the Septuagint and the New Testament. I argue that a broad distinction can be made between two main uses, called ‘durative progressive’ and ‘focalized progressive’. In both cases, a number of syntactic frames can be specified in which the periphrastic construction occurs. I conclude the article by discussing the relationship between the Septuagintal and the New Testamental use of the periphrastic construction, arguing that while there are many similarities, this relationship should not be conceived of in terms of imitation, as some scholars have suggested.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
New Testament, verbal periphrasis, syntax, progressive aspect, Septuagint
journal title
NOVUM TESTAMENTUM
Novum Testam.
volume
55
issue
2
pages
168 - 192
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000317446900004
ISSN
0048-1009
DOI
10.1163/15685365-12341410
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3025360
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3025360
date created
2012-10-11 17:22:03
date last changed
2015-06-17 10:16:44
@article{3025360,
  abstract     = {In this article, I discuss the use of the periphrastic progressive construction of \ensuremath{\epsilon}\unmatched{1f30}\ensuremath{\mu}\unmatched{1f77} {\textacutedbl}be{\textacutedbl} with present participle in the Septuagint and the New Testament. I argue that a broad distinction can be made between two main uses, called {\textquoteleft}durative progressive{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}focalized progressive{\textquoteright}. In both cases, a number of syntactic frames can be specified in which the periphrastic construction occurs. I conclude the article by discussing the relationship between the Septuagintal and the New Testamental use of the periphrastic construction, arguing that while there are many similarities, this relationship should not be conceived of in terms of imitation, as some scholars have suggested.},
  author       = {Bentein, Klaas},
  issn         = {0048-1009},
  journal      = {NOVUM TESTAMENTUM},
  keyword      = {New Testament,verbal periphrasis,syntax,progressive aspect,Septuagint},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {168--192},
  title        = {The syntax of the periphrastic progressive in the Septuagint and the New Testament},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/15685365-12341410},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Bentein, Klaas. 2013. “The Syntax of the Periphrastic Progressive in the Septuagint and the New Testament.” Novum Testamentum 55 (2): 168–192.
APA
Bentein, K. (2013). The syntax of the periphrastic progressive in the Septuagint and the New Testament. NOVUM TESTAMENTUM, 55(2), 168–192.
Vancouver
1.
Bentein K. The syntax of the periphrastic progressive in the Septuagint and the New Testament. NOVUM TESTAMENTUM. 2013;55(2):168–92.
MLA
Bentein, Klaas. “The Syntax of the Periphrastic Progressive in the Septuagint and the New Testament.” NOVUM TESTAMENTUM 55.2 (2013): 168–192. Print.