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Co-designing interactive content: developing a traffic safety game concept for adolescents

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Abstract
Co-design is a user-centered design method which has gained popularity in innovation research where it is used for opportunity detection for new applications or technology based systems and to better tune their development to the user’s requirements and preferences. It has only rarely been used as a tool for content creation however. This study explores the added value of co-design in addition to other innovation research methods in the process of developing interactive content. Co-design sessions took place as part of the development of a concept for a digital location-based educational game dealing with traffic safety. Before, a state of the art literature survey, a focus group with traffic safety experts and collaboration with a professional game designer had resulted in a number of preliminary game concepts. In total, 72 adolescents between 15 and 18 years participated in five co-design sessions lead by a researcher and a professional game designer. The sessions provided input regarding the locations in the city where adolescents would like to play mini-games, the mobile phone technologies they would use, the topics that interest them and the game mechanics they would find enjoyable. In the final design document, several ideas coming from the co-design sessions have been picked up and integrated. Thus our study indicates that co-design can be a source of additional ideas on top of other innovation research methods such as SotA and expert consultation and thus lead to more effective interactive content creation.
Keywords
adolescents, co-design, content creation, game-based learning, traffic safety

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MLA
All, Anissa, Jan Van Looy, and Elena Patricia Nunez Castellar. “Co-designing Interactive Content: Developing a Traffic Safety Game Concept for Adolescents.” 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Proceedings. Ed. P Felicia. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Communication studies, 2012. 11–20. Print.
APA
All, A., Van Looy, J., & Nunez Castellar, E. P. (2012). Co-designing interactive content: developing a traffic safety game concept for adolescents. In P Felicia (Ed.), 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Proceedings (pp. 11–20). Presented at the 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning (ECGBL - 2012), Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Communication studies.
Chicago author-date
All, Anissa, Jan Van Looy, and Elena Patricia Nunez Castellar. 2012. “Co-designing Interactive Content: Developing a Traffic Safety Game Concept for Adolescents.” In 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Proceedings, ed. P Felicia, 11–20. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Communication studies.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
All, Anissa, Jan Van Looy, and Elena Patricia Nunez Castellar. 2012. “Co-designing Interactive Content: Developing a Traffic Safety Game Concept for Adolescents.” In 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Proceedings, ed. P Felicia, 11–20. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Communication studies.
Vancouver
1.
All A, Van Looy J, Nunez Castellar EP. Co-designing interactive content: developing a traffic safety game concept for adolescents. In: Felicia P, editor. 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Proceedings. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University, Department of Communication studies; 2012. p. 11–20.
IEEE
[1]
A. All, J. Van Looy, and E. P. Nunez Castellar, “Co-designing interactive content: developing a traffic safety game concept for adolescents,” in 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Proceedings, Cork, Ireland, 2012, pp. 11–20.
@inproceedings{3009707,
  abstract     = {Co-design is a user-centered design method which has gained popularity in innovation research where it is used for opportunity detection for new applications or technology based systems and to better tune their development to the user’s requirements and preferences. It has only rarely been used as a tool for content creation however. This study explores the added value of co-design in addition to other innovation research methods in the process of developing interactive content. Co-design sessions took place as part of the development of a concept for a digital location-based educational game dealing with traffic safety. Before, a state of the art literature survey, a focus group with traffic safety experts and collaboration with a professional game designer had resulted in a number of preliminary game concepts. In total, 72 adolescents between 15 and 18 years participated in five co-design sessions lead by a researcher and a professional game designer. The sessions provided input regarding the locations in the city where adolescents would like to play mini-games, the mobile phone technologies they would use, the topics that interest them and the game mechanics they would find enjoyable. In the final design document, several ideas coming from the co-design sessions have been picked up and integrated. Thus our study indicates that co-design can be a source of additional ideas on top of other innovation research methods such as SotA and expert consultation and thus lead to more effective interactive content creation.},
  author       = {All, Anissa and Van Looy, Jan and Nunez Castellar, Elena Patricia},
  booktitle    = {6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Proceedings},
  editor       = {Felicia, P},
  isbn         = {9781908272706},
  keywords     = {adolescents,co-design,content creation,game-based learning,traffic safety},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Cork, Ireland},
  pages        = {11--20},
  publisher    = {Ghent University, Department of Communication studies},
  title        = {Co-designing interactive content: developing a traffic safety game concept for adolescents},
  year         = {2012},
}

Web of Science
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