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The influence of a vestibular dysfunction on the motor development of hearing-impaired children

Alexandra De Kegel, Leen Maes UGent, Tina Baetens, Ingeborg Dhooge UGent and Hilde Van Waelvelde UGent (2012) LARYNGOSCOPE. 122(12). p.2837-2843
abstract
Objectives/Hypothesis: To identify the predictive ability of vestibular function test results on motor performance among hearing-impaired children. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Fifty-one typically developing children and 48 children with a unilateral (n ¼ 9) or bilateral hearing impairment (n ¼ 39) of more than 40 dB HL between 3 and 12 years were tested by the Movement Assessment Battery for Children–Second Edition (M ABC-2), clinical balance tests, posturography, rotatory chair testing, and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). From the group of hearing-impaired children, 23 had cochlear implants. Results: Balance performance on M ABC-2, clinical balance tests, as well as the sway velocity assessed by posturography in bipedal stance on a cushion with eyes closed and in unilateral stance differed significantly between both groups. Presence of a VEMP response is an important clinical parameter because comparison of the motor performance among hearingimpaired children between those with present and absent VEMPs showed significant differences in balance performance. The three most important predictor variables on motor performance by bivariate regression analyses are the vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) gain value of the rotatory chair test at 0.01 and 0.05 Hz frequency, as well as the VEMP asymmetry ratio. Multivariate regression analyses suggest that the VOR asymmetry value of the rotatory chair test at 0.05 Hz and the etiology of the hearing loss seem to have additional predictive value. Conclusions: Hearing-impaired children are at risk for balance deficits. A combination of rotatory chair testing and VEMP testing can predict the balance performance.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
vestibular function testing, Balance performance, TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY, hearing-impaired children, INFANTS, IMPAIRMENTS, DEFICITS, BALANCE, SACCULAR FUNCTION, DEAF-CHILDREN, COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION
journal title
LARYNGOSCOPE
Laryngoscope
volume
122
issue
12
pages
2837 - 2843
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000312540000038
JCR category
OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY
JCR impact factor
1.979 (2012)
JCR rank
7/43 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0023-852X
DOI
10.1002/lary.23529
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
additional info
Leen Maes, AUD, PhD, and Alexandra De Kegel, PT, share first authorship
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3008374
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3008374
date created
2012-10-08 10:56:38
date last changed
2016-12-19 15:39:52
@article{3008374,
  abstract     = {Objectives/Hypothesis: To identify the predictive ability of vestibular function test results on motor performance among hearing-impaired children.
Study Design: Cross-sectional study.
Methods: Fifty-one typically developing children and 48 children with a unilateral (n {\textonequarter} 9) or bilateral hearing impairment (n {\textonequarter} 39) of more than 40 dB HL between 3 and 12 years were tested by the Movement Assessment Battery for Children--Second Edition (M ABC-2), clinical balance tests, posturography, rotatory chair testing, and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). From the group of hearing-impaired children, 23 had cochlear implants.
Results: Balance performance on M ABC-2, clinical balance tests, as well as the sway velocity assessed by posturography in bipedal stance on a cushion with eyes closed and in unilateral stance differed significantly between both groups. Presence of a VEMP response is an important clinical parameter because comparison of the motor performance among hearingimpaired children between those with present and absent VEMPs showed significant differences in balance performance. The three most important predictor variables on motor performance by bivariate regression analyses are the vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) gain value of the rotatory chair test at 0.01 and 0.05 Hz frequency, as well as the VEMP asymmetry ratio. Multivariate regression analyses suggest that the VOR asymmetry value of the rotatory chair test at 0.05 Hz and the etiology of the hearing loss seem to have additional predictive value.
Conclusions: Hearing-impaired children are at risk for balance deficits. A combination of rotatory chair testing and VEMP testing can predict the balance performance.},
  author       = {De Kegel, Alexandra and Maes, Leen and Baetens, Tina and Dhooge, Ingeborg and Van Waelvelde, Hilde},
  issn         = {0023-852X},
  journal      = {LARYNGOSCOPE},
  keyword      = {vestibular function testing,Balance performance,TEST-RETEST RELIABILITY,hearing-impaired children,INFANTS,IMPAIRMENTS,DEFICITS,BALANCE,SACCULAR FUNCTION,DEAF-CHILDREN,COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {2837--2843},
  title        = {The influence of a vestibular dysfunction on the motor development of hearing-impaired children},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.23529},
  volume       = {122},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
De Kegel, Alexandra, Leen Maes, Tina Baetens, Ingeborg Dhooge, and Hilde Van Waelvelde. 2012. “The Influence of a Vestibular Dysfunction on the Motor Development of Hearing-impaired Children.” Laryngoscope 122 (12): 2837–2843.
APA
De Kegel, A., Maes, L., Baetens, T., Dhooge, I., & Van Waelvelde, H. (2012). The influence of a vestibular dysfunction on the motor development of hearing-impaired children. LARYNGOSCOPE, 122(12), 2837–2843.
Vancouver
1.
De Kegel A, Maes L, Baetens T, Dhooge I, Van Waelvelde H. The influence of a vestibular dysfunction on the motor development of hearing-impaired children. LARYNGOSCOPE. 2012;122(12):2837–43.
MLA
De Kegel, Alexandra, Leen Maes, Tina Baetens, et al. “The Influence of a Vestibular Dysfunction on the Motor Development of Hearing-impaired Children.” LARYNGOSCOPE 122.12 (2012): 2837–2843. Print.