Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Comparison of four techniques for synoviocentesis of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath: a cadaveric study

Mireia Jordana-Garcia UGent, Maarten Oosterlinck UGent, Frederik Pille UGent, Ariane Valère UGent and Ann Martens UGent (2012) VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY. 25(3). p.178-183
abstract
Objective: To compare four different techniques for synoviocentesis of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS). Methods: Fifteen inexperienced operators performed each of the following injection techniques on two cadaveric limbs: Proximal (at the proximal recess of the DFTS), Axial (axial to the proximal sesamoid bone), Base (at the base of the proximal sesamoid bone), and Distal (at the pastern). The number of attempts needed before the needle was assumed to be correctly positioned into the DFTS was recorded and 10 ml of methylene blue was injected. The limbs were dissected to determine the presence of methylene blue in the DFTS, the distance between the needle entrance point and the lateral palmar or plantar (digital) nerve, the degree of subcutaneous leakage and the distance between the border of the leakage zone and the lateral digital nerve. Results: The Axial (29/30) and Distal (25/30) approaches had the highest numbers of successful injections. The median number of attempts was highest for the Axial approach. The distances from the injection point and from the border of the leakage zone to the lateral digital nerve were longer for Distal and Axial approaches. Clinical relevance: In the hands of inexperienced operators, the Axial approach was the most successful technique for injection of the equine DFTS. Sparse subcutaneous leakage and larger distance to the nerve when using this technique might decrease the risk of inadvertent palmar or plantar digital nerve desensitisation when performing DFTS analgesia.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
synoviocentesis, Digital flexor tendon sheath, horse, palmar digital nerve, plantar digital nerve, anaesthesia, HORSES, TENOSYNOVITIS, JOINT
journal title
VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY
Vet. Comp. Orthop. Traumatol.
volume
25
issue
3
pages
178 - 183
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000304798300003
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
1.013 (2012)
JCR rank
64/142 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0932-0814
DOI
10.3415/VCOT-11-06-0085
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3007663
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3007663
date created
2012-10-05 15:01:42
date last changed
2012-10-10 11:42:04
@article{3007663,
  abstract     = {Objective: To compare four different techniques for synoviocentesis of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS). 
Methods: Fifteen inexperienced operators performed each of the following injection techniques on two cadaveric limbs: Proximal (at the proximal recess of the DFTS), Axial (axial to the proximal sesamoid bone), Base (at the base of the proximal sesamoid bone), and Distal (at the pastern). The number of attempts needed before the needle was assumed to be correctly positioned into the DFTS was recorded and 10 ml of methylene blue was injected. The limbs were dissected to determine the presence of methylene blue in the DFTS, the distance between the needle entrance point and the lateral palmar or plantar (digital) nerve, the degree of subcutaneous leakage and the distance between the border of the leakage zone and the lateral digital nerve. 
Results: The Axial (29/30) and Distal (25/30) approaches had the highest numbers of successful injections. The median number of attempts was highest for the Axial approach. The distances from the injection point and from the border of the leakage zone to the lateral digital nerve were longer for Distal and Axial approaches. 
Clinical relevance: In the hands of inexperienced operators, the Axial approach was the most successful technique for injection of the equine DFTS. Sparse subcutaneous leakage and larger distance to the nerve when using this technique might decrease the risk of inadvertent palmar or plantar digital nerve desensitisation when performing DFTS analgesia.},
  author       = {Jordana-Garcia, Mireia and Oosterlinck, Maarten and Pille, Frederik and Val{\`e}re, Ariane and Martens, Ann},
  issn         = {0932-0814},
  journal      = {VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY},
  keyword      = {synoviocentesis,Digital flexor tendon sheath,horse,palmar digital nerve,plantar digital nerve,anaesthesia,HORSES,TENOSYNOVITIS,JOINT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {178--183},
  title        = {Comparison of four techniques for synoviocentesis of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath: a cadaveric study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3415/VCOT-11-06-0085},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Jordana-Garcia, Mireia, Maarten Oosterlinck, Frederik Pille, Ariane Valère, and Ann Martens. 2012. “Comparison of Four Techniques for Synoviocentesis of the Equine Digital Flexor Tendon Sheath: a Cadaveric Study.” Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology 25 (3): 178–183.
APA
Jordana-Garcia, M., Oosterlinck, M., Pille, F., Valère, A., & Martens, A. (2012). Comparison of four techniques for synoviocentesis of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath: a cadaveric study. VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY, 25(3), 178–183.
Vancouver
1.
Jordana-Garcia M, Oosterlinck M, Pille F, Valère A, Martens A. Comparison of four techniques for synoviocentesis of the equine digital flexor tendon sheath: a cadaveric study. VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY. 2012;25(3):178–83.
MLA
Jordana-Garcia, Mireia, Maarten Oosterlinck, Frederik Pille, et al. “Comparison of Four Techniques for Synoviocentesis of the Equine Digital Flexor Tendon Sheath: a Cadaveric Study.” VETERINARY AND COMPARATIVE ORTHOPAEDICS AND TRAUMATOLOGY 25.3 (2012): 178–183. Print.