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The distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo: clues for somatic mosaicism

Nanja van Geel UGent, Reinhart Speeckaert UGent, Elodie Melsens UGent, SP Toelle, Marijn Speeckaert UGent, Sofie De Schepper UGent, Jo Lambert UGent and Lieve Brochez UGent (2013) BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY. 168(1). p.56-64
abstract
Background : Segmental vitiligo is characterized by a unilateral and localized distribution. So far, the underlying mechanism is still an enigma. Objectives To get an insight into the aetiopathogenesis of segmental vitiligo by comparison with the distribution pattern of dermatoses with a possible mosaic or neurogenic background. Methods : In this retrospective observational study the distribution pattern of 724 unilateral, linear or band-shaped control lesions was compared with 181 segmental vitiligo lesions. Clinical photographs were used to score similarities according to a defined grading system (scale ranging from 0 for no similarities to 4 for complete similarity). Control lesions were evaluated both individually and after grouping into different cell types. Results : In general, only a minority of cases (36.9%), showed similarities (grade 1-4) between control lesions and segmental vitiligo. Grade 2-4 similarities were seen mainly in segmental lentiginosis (73.7%, P < 0 001). The best grade for correspondence (grade 3-4) was observed significantly more only in segmental lentiginosis (36.8% vs. 3.5%, P < 0 001) and epidermal naevus verrucosus (12.5% vs. 3.7%, P = 0 008) compared with the other control lesions. The distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo significantly overlapped those of other disorders originating from melanocytes. Conclusions : Our results demonstrate that the distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo is not entirely similar to any other skin disease, although some mosaic skin disorders have more overlap with segmental vitiligo than others. The remarkable clinical similarity with several cases of mosaic diseases involving melanocytes supports the hypothesis that cutaneous mosaicism may be involved in segmental vitiligo.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
LINES, BLASCHKO, NEVI, SKIN
journal title
BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY
Br. J. Dermatol.
volume
168
issue
1
pages
56 - 64
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000314469000039
JCR category
DERMATOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.1 (2013)
JCR rank
7/61 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0007-0963
DOI
10.1111/bjd.12013
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3006474
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3006474
date created
2012-10-04 17:04:44
date last changed
2015-02-01 00:30:49
@article{3006474,
  abstract     = {Background : Segmental vitiligo is characterized by a unilateral and localized distribution. So far, the underlying mechanism is still an enigma. Objectives To get an insight into the aetiopathogenesis of segmental vitiligo by comparison with the distribution pattern of dermatoses with a possible mosaic or neurogenic background. 
Methods : In this retrospective observational study the distribution pattern of 724 unilateral, linear or band-shaped control lesions was compared with 181 segmental vitiligo lesions. Clinical photographs were used to score similarities according to a defined grading system (scale ranging from 0 for no similarities to 4 for complete similarity). Control lesions were evaluated both individually and after grouping into different cell types. 
Results : In general, only a minority of cases (36.9\%), showed similarities (grade 1-4) between control lesions and segmental vitiligo. Grade 2-4 similarities were seen mainly in segmental lentiginosis (73.7\%, P {\textlangle} 0 001). The best grade for correspondence (grade 3-4) was observed significantly more only in segmental lentiginosis (36.8\% vs. 3.5\%, P {\textlangle} 0 001) and epidermal naevus verrucosus (12.5\% vs. 3.7\%, P = 0 008) compared with the other control lesions. The distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo significantly overlapped those of other disorders originating from melanocytes. 
Conclusions : Our results demonstrate that the distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo is not entirely similar to any other skin disease, although some mosaic skin disorders have more overlap with segmental vitiligo than others. The remarkable clinical similarity with several cases of mosaic diseases involving melanocytes supports the hypothesis that cutaneous mosaicism may be involved in segmental vitiligo.},
  author       = {van Geel, Nanja and Speeckaert, Reinhart and Melsens, Elodie and Toelle, SP and Speeckaert, Marijn and De Schepper, Sofie and Lambert, Jo and Brochez, Lieve},
  issn         = {0007-0963},
  journal      = {BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY},
  keyword      = {LINES,BLASCHKO,NEVI,SKIN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {56--64},
  title        = {The distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo: clues for somatic mosaicism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjd.12013},
  volume       = {168},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
van Geel, Nanja, Reinhart Speeckaert, Elodie Melsens, SP Toelle, MARIJN SPEECKAERT, Sofie De Schepper, Jo Lambert, and Lieve Brochez. 2013. “The Distribution Pattern of Segmental Vitiligo: Clues for Somatic Mosaicism.” British Journal of Dermatology 168 (1): 56–64.
APA
van Geel, N., Speeckaert, R., Melsens, E., Toelle, S., SPEECKAERT, M., De Schepper, S., Lambert, J., et al. (2013). The distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo: clues for somatic mosaicism. BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, 168(1), 56–64.
Vancouver
1.
van Geel N, Speeckaert R, Melsens E, Toelle S, SPEECKAERT M, De Schepper S, et al. The distribution pattern of segmental vitiligo: clues for somatic mosaicism. BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY. 2013;168(1):56–64.
MLA
van Geel, Nanja, Reinhart Speeckaert, Elodie Melsens, et al. “The Distribution Pattern of Segmental Vitiligo: Clues for Somatic Mosaicism.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY 168.1 (2013): 56–64. Print.