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Characterization of a family of Arabidopsis trehalose biosynthesis genes and their role in root development and stress tolerance

Lorena Lopez Galvis UGent (2011)
abstract
Sugars are the fuel of life to plants and other organisms. They are the result of the fixed energy from the sun that feeds the plant cells to sustain growth and development. Sucrose is the main sugar transported in the plant and, as such reaches the cells where it is cleaved in glucose and fructose. Many vital processes are governed by sugars, but complex networks had to evolve allowing the plant to trigger the right program depending on its energy status. Surprisingly, one sugar phosphate is emerging to connect carbon status with the growth program. That sugar is trehalose-6-phosphate, the intermediate on the trehalose metabolism pathway. This molecule is a signal of sucrose status in the cell and it is also an inhibitor of the main regulator of starvation responses in plants. The mechanism mediating trehalose-6-phosphate balancing of energy levels is waiting to be unraveled. The aim of this work was to scout into the possible role of the trehalose biosynthesis pathway in root development and stress tolerance. The focus was on the 10 active phosphatase members that convert the intermediate trehalose-6-phosphate into trehalose. By a forward genetics approach, we could identify two potential candidates important for lateral root development. Interestingly, they appear to function in an antagonistic manner in this organogenesis process and are regulated by auxin. Additionally, two other enzymes in the trehalose pathway were found to regulate abscisic acid responses. With these results, we open a big window of research searching on the molecular and hormonal components interacting with the trehalose pathway.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
promoter
Patrick Van Dijck and UGent
organization
year
type
dissertation (monograph)
subject
pages
VII, 147 pages
publisher
KU Leuven. Faculty of Sciences ; Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences
place of publication
Leuven ; Ghent, Belgium
defense location
Zwijnaarde : Technologiepark (FSVM building)
defense date
2011-06-29 16:00
ISBN
9789086494354
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
D1
additional info
dissertation consists of copyrighted material
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3006334
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3006334
date created
2012-10-04 12:46:39
date last changed
2012-10-05 10:50:02
@phdthesis{3006334,
  abstract     = {Sugars are the fuel of life to plants and other organisms. They are the result of the fixed energy from the sun that feeds the plant cells to sustain growth and development. Sucrose is the main sugar transported in the plant and, as such reaches the cells where it is cleaved in glucose and fructose. Many vital processes are governed by sugars, but complex networks had to evolve allowing the plant to trigger the right program depending on its energy status. Surprisingly, one sugar phosphate is emerging to connect carbon status with the growth program. That sugar is trehalose-6-phosphate, the intermediate on the trehalose metabolism pathway. This molecule is a signal of sucrose status in the cell and it is also an inhibitor of the main regulator of starvation responses in plants. The mechanism mediating trehalose-6-phosphate balancing of energy levels is waiting to be unraveled. The aim of this work was to scout into the possible role of the trehalose biosynthesis pathway in root development and stress tolerance. The focus was on the 10 active phosphatase members that convert the intermediate trehalose-6-phosphate into trehalose. By a forward genetics approach, we could identify two potential candidates important for lateral root development. Interestingly, they appear to function in an antagonistic manner in this organogenesis process and are regulated by auxin. Additionally, two other enzymes in the trehalose pathway were found to regulate abscisic acid responses. With these results, we open a big window of research searching on the molecular and hormonal components interacting with the trehalose pathway.},
  author       = {Lopez Galvis, Lorena},
  isbn         = {9789086494354},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {VII, 147},
  publisher    = {KU Leuven. Faculty of Sciences ; Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Characterization of a family of Arabidopsis trehalose biosynthesis genes and their role in root development and stress tolerance},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Lopez Galvis, Lorena. 2011. “Characterization of a Family of Arabidopsis Trehalose Biosynthesis Genes and Their Role in Root Development and Stress Tolerance”. Leuven ; Ghent, Belgium: KU Leuven. Faculty of Sciences ; Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences.
APA
Lopez Galvis, L. (2011). Characterization of a family of Arabidopsis trehalose biosynthesis genes and their role in root development and stress tolerance. KU Leuven. Faculty of Sciences ; Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences, Leuven ; Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Lopez Galvis L. Characterization of a family of Arabidopsis trehalose biosynthesis genes and their role in root development and stress tolerance. [Leuven ; Ghent, Belgium]: KU Leuven. Faculty of Sciences ; Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences; 2011.
MLA
Lopez Galvis, Lorena. “Characterization of a Family of Arabidopsis Trehalose Biosynthesis Genes and Their Role in Root Development and Stress Tolerance.” 2011 : n. pag. Print.