Advanced search
1 file | 293.44 KB Add to list

Attentional prioritization of threatening information: examining the role of the size of the attentional window

Lies Notebaert (UGent) , Geert Crombez (UGent) , Stefaan Van Damme (UGent) , Wouter Durnez (UGent) and J Theeuwes
(2013) COGNITION & EMOTION. 27(4). p.621-631
Author
Organization
Abstract
In line with most models of emotion, research has shown that threatening information receives attentional priority over neutral information. Recently, it has been suggested that the degree to which participants divide their attention across the visual field (the attentional window) may modulate the extent to which salient objects are attentionally prioritised. In the current study, participants were required to identify a target inside one of a variable number of coloured circles. One colour (Conditioned Stimulus, CS +) was fear-conditioned using an electrocutaneous stimulus at tolerance level. This search task was combined with a go/no-go task that required participants to either divide attention across the visual field to create a broad attentional window (global group), or focus their attention on the fixation point to create a narrow attentional window (local group). The results showed that only in the global group was the CS + colour prioritised over the neutral colours, indicating that a broader attentional window leads to enhanced attentional prioritisation of threat. Implications for research on attentional bias to threat are discussed.
Keywords
TIME-COURSE, ANXIETY, CAPTURE, FACES, BIAS, Attentional bias, Threat, Classical conditioning, Anxiety, Fear, Attentional window, Prioritisation, Capture

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 293.44 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Notebaert, Lies, Geert Crombez, Stefaan Van Damme, et al. “Attentional Prioritization of Threatening Information: Examining the Role of the Size of the Attentional Window.” COGNITION & EMOTION 27.4 (2013): 621–631. Print.
APA
Notebaert, L., Crombez, G., Van Damme, S., Durnez, W., & Theeuwes, J. (2013). Attentional prioritization of threatening information: examining the role of the size of the attentional window. COGNITION & EMOTION, 27(4), 621–631.
Chicago author-date
Notebaert, Lies, Geert Crombez, Stefaan Van Damme, Wouter Durnez, and J Theeuwes. 2013. “Attentional Prioritization of Threatening Information: Examining the Role of the Size of the Attentional Window.” Cognition & Emotion 27 (4): 621–631.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Notebaert, Lies, Geert Crombez, Stefaan Van Damme, Wouter Durnez, and J Theeuwes. 2013. “Attentional Prioritization of Threatening Information: Examining the Role of the Size of the Attentional Window.” Cognition & Emotion 27 (4): 621–631.
Vancouver
1.
Notebaert L, Crombez G, Van Damme S, Durnez W, Theeuwes J. Attentional prioritization of threatening information: examining the role of the size of the attentional window. COGNITION & EMOTION. 2013;27(4):621–31.
IEEE
[1]
L. Notebaert, G. Crombez, S. Van Damme, W. Durnez, and J. Theeuwes, “Attentional prioritization of threatening information: examining the role of the size of the attentional window,” COGNITION & EMOTION, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 621–631, 2013.
@article{3005563,
  abstract     = {In line with most models of emotion, research has shown that threatening information receives attentional priority over neutral information. Recently, it has been suggested that the degree to which participants divide their attention across the visual field (the attentional window) may modulate the extent to which salient objects are attentionally prioritised. In the current study, participants were required to identify a target inside one of a variable number of coloured circles. One colour (Conditioned Stimulus, CS +) was fear-conditioned using an electrocutaneous stimulus at tolerance level. This search task was combined with a go/no-go task that required participants to either divide attention across the visual field to create a broad attentional window (global group), or focus their attention on the fixation point to create a narrow attentional window (local group). The results showed that only in the global group was the CS + colour prioritised over the neutral colours, indicating that a broader attentional window leads to enhanced attentional prioritisation of threat. Implications for research on attentional bias to threat are discussed.},
  author       = {Notebaert, Lies and Crombez, Geert and Van Damme, Stefaan and Durnez, Wouter and Theeuwes, J},
  issn         = {0269-9931},
  journal      = {COGNITION & EMOTION},
  keywords     = {TIME-COURSE,ANXIETY,CAPTURE,FACES,BIAS,Attentional bias,Threat,Classical conditioning,Anxiety,Fear,Attentional window,Prioritisation,Capture},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {621--631},
  title        = {Attentional prioritization of threatening information: examining the role of the size of the attentional window},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2012.730036},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2013},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: