Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Protein subcellular trafficking during the oxidative stress response in plants

Annelies Inzé UGent (2012)
abstract
Due to their sessile lifestyle, plants are permanently exposed to a variety of adverse environmental conditions leading to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered as harmful byproducts of aerobic metabolism reacting in high concentrations with all cellular components, ROS are generally accepted as key signaling molecules that coordinate a broad range of environmental and developmental processes. At the beginning of my Ph.D., significant progress has been made in the description of oxidative stressdependent gene expression, but the regulation of the complex ROS signal transduction network remains largely unknown. The functional analysis of proteins that are encoded by genes that rapidly respond to ROS can therefore give novel insights into the early signaling steps triggered by a sudden increase in intracellular ROS. During adverse environmental conditions, the regulation of dynamic protein trafficking is an important intracellular signaling strategy to elicit a fast defense response. The aim of this project was to identify and characterize proteins that relocalize during oxidative stress. Therefore, we first made a comprehensive inventory of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced genes by comparing H2O2-related expression data sets and selected in a well-considered manner 85 candidate genes for further functional studies. We focussed our selection on genes encoding transcription factors and proteins of unknown function. To identify proteins with a potential dynamic behaviour during oxidative stress, we employed two medium-throughput localization screens of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and by stable expression in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants with perturbed levels of interesting candidate genes were assayed for altered tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress. The identification of proteins that dynamically relocalize during stress conditions, together with a detailed understanding of the mechanisms behind the identified oxidative stress-induced relocalizations, will provide a better understanding of stress response signaling.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
promoter
UGent
organization
year
type
dissertation (monograph)
subject
pages
208 pages
publisher
Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences
place of publication
Ghent, Belgium
defense location
Zwijnaarde : Technologiepark (FSVM building)
defense date
2012-02-29 16:00
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
D1
additional info
dissertation consists of copyrighted material
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3005515
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3005515
date created
2012-10-03 15:44:28
date last changed
2012-10-05 09:17:05
@phdthesis{3005515,
  abstract     = {Due to their sessile lifestyle, plants are permanently exposed to a variety of adverse environmental conditions leading to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although initially considered as harmful byproducts of aerobic metabolism reacting in high concentrations with all cellular components, ROS are generally accepted as key signaling molecules that coordinate a broad range of environmental and developmental processes. At the beginning of my Ph.D., significant progress has been made in the description of oxidative stressdependent gene expression, but the regulation of the complex ROS signal transduction network remains largely unknown. The functional analysis of proteins that are encoded by genes that rapidly respond to ROS can therefore give novel insights into the early signaling steps triggered by a sudden increase in intracellular ROS. During adverse environmental conditions, the regulation of dynamic protein trafficking is an important intracellular signaling strategy to elicit a fast defense response. The aim of this project was to identify and characterize proteins that relocalize during oxidative stress. Therefore, we first made a comprehensive inventory of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced genes by comparing H2O2-related expression data sets and selected in a well-considered manner 85 candidate genes for further functional studies. We focussed our selection on genes encoding transcription factors and proteins of unknown function. To identify proteins with a potential dynamic behaviour during oxidative stress, we employed two medium-throughput localization screens of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and by stable expression in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants with perturbed levels of interesting candidate genes were assayed for altered tolerance to abiotic and biotic stress. The identification of proteins that dynamically relocalize during stress conditions, together with a detailed understanding of the mechanisms behind the identified oxidative stress-induced relocalizations, will provide a better understanding of stress response signaling.},
  author       = {Inz{\'e}, Annelies},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {208},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Protein subcellular trafficking during the oxidative stress response in plants},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Inzé, Annelies. 2012. “Protein Subcellular Trafficking During the Oxidative Stress Response in Plants”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences.
APA
Inzé, A. (2012). Protein subcellular trafficking during the oxidative stress response in plants. Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Inzé A. Protein subcellular trafficking during the oxidative stress response in plants. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Sciences; 2012.
MLA
Inzé, Annelies. “Protein Subcellular Trafficking During the Oxidative Stress Response in Plants.” 2012 : n. pag. Print.