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Biomechanical insights into the aetiology of inspraspinatus syndrome

Jonathan C Reeser, Glenn S Fleisig, Ann Cools UGent, Darcie Yount and Scott A Magnes (2013) BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE. 47(4). p.239-244
abstract
OBJECTIVE:Infraspinatus syndrome (IS) results from injury to the suprascapular nerve. For reasons that are poorly understood, volleyball players are at greater risk of developing IS than are athletes who compete in other overhead sports. Differences between the shoulder kinematics of volleyball-related overhead skills and those skills demanded by other overhead sports might explain the pronounced prevalence of IS among volleyball athletes. DESIGN: Observational, laboratory-based, cross-sectional study. SETTING: The American Sports Medicine Institute. PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen healthy female Division 1 collegiate volleyball athletes. METHODS: Upper limb biomechanics of 14 healthy female Division 1 collegiate volleyball athletes while spiking and serving were quantified, then compared to the results from data previously obtained from female baseball pitchers and tennis players. RESULTS: Although the general movement pattern at the shoulder girdle is qualitatively similar for the upper limb skills required by a variety of overhead sports, volleyball spiking and serving result in greater shoulder abduction and horizontal adduction at the moment of ball contact/release than do baseball pitching or tennis serving. CONCLUSION: The authors suggest that the unique scapular mechanics which permit the extreme shoulder abduction and horizontal adduction that characterise volleyball spiking and serving place anatomically predisposed volleyball athletes at increased risk for developing cumulative traction-related injury to the suprascapular nerve at the level of the spinoglenoid notch.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS, SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE ENTRAPMENT, MUSCLE ATROPHY, NEUROPATHY, PERFORMANCE, PREVALENCE
journal title
BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE
Br. J. Sports Med.
volume
47
issue
4
pages
239 - 244
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000314832400011
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
4.171 (2013)
JCR rank
6/81 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0306-3674
DOI
10.1136/bjsports-2011-090918
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3003533
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3003533
date created
2012-10-01 20:26:10
date last changed
2013-07-10 14:30:41
@article{3003533,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE:Infraspinatus syndrome (IS) results from injury to the suprascapular nerve. For reasons that are poorly understood, volleyball players are at greater risk of developing IS than are athletes who compete in other overhead sports. Differences between the shoulder kinematics of volleyball-related overhead skills and those skills demanded by other overhead sports might explain the pronounced prevalence of IS among volleyball athletes.
DESIGN: Observational, laboratory-based, cross-sectional study.
SETTING: The American Sports Medicine Institute.
PARTICIPANTS: Fourteen healthy female Division 1 collegiate volleyball athletes.
METHODS: Upper limb biomechanics of 14 healthy female Division 1 collegiate volleyball athletes while spiking and serving were quantified, then compared to the results from data previously obtained from female baseball pitchers and tennis players.
RESULTS: Although the general movement pattern at the shoulder girdle is qualitatively similar for the upper limb skills required by a variety of overhead sports, volleyball spiking and serving result in greater shoulder abduction and horizontal adduction at the moment of ball contact/release than do baseball pitching or tennis serving.
CONCLUSION: The authors suggest that the unique scapular mechanics which permit the extreme shoulder abduction and horizontal adduction that characterise volleyball spiking and serving place anatomically predisposed volleyball athletes at increased risk for developing cumulative traction-related injury to the suprascapular nerve at the level of the spinoglenoid notch.},
  author       = {Reeser, Jonathan C and Fleisig, Glenn S and Cools, Ann and Yount, Darcie and Magnes, Scott A},
  issn         = {0306-3674},
  journal      = {BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE},
  keyword      = {VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS,SUPRASCAPULAR NERVE ENTRAPMENT,MUSCLE ATROPHY,NEUROPATHY,PERFORMANCE,PREVALENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {239--244},
  title        = {Biomechanical insights into the aetiology of inspraspinatus syndrome},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2011-090918},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Reeser, Jonathan C, Glenn S Fleisig, Ann Cools, Darcie Yount, and Scott A Magnes. 2013. “Biomechanical Insights into the Aetiology of Inspraspinatus Syndrome.” British Journal of Sports Medicine 47 (4): 239–244.
APA
Reeser, J. C., Fleisig, G. S., Cools, A., Yount, D., & Magnes, S. A. (2013). Biomechanical insights into the aetiology of inspraspinatus syndrome. BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 47(4), 239–244.
Vancouver
1.
Reeser JC, Fleisig GS, Cools A, Yount D, Magnes SA. Biomechanical insights into the aetiology of inspraspinatus syndrome. BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE. 2013;47(4):239–44.
MLA
Reeser, Jonathan C, Glenn S Fleisig, Ann Cools, et al. “Biomechanical Insights into the Aetiology of Inspraspinatus Syndrome.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE 47.4 (2013): 239–244. Print.