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Clinical assessment of the scapula: a review of the literature

Filip Struyf, Jo Nys, Sarah Mottram, Nathalie A Roussel, Ann Cools UGent and Romain Meeusen (2013) BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE.
abstract
Scientific evidence supporting a role for faulty scapular positioning in patients with various shoulder disorders is cumulating. Clinicians who manage patients with shoulder pain and athletes at risk of developing shoulder pain need to have the skills to assess static and dynamic scapular positioning and dynamic control. Several methods for the assessment of scapular positioning are described in scientific literature. However, the majority uses expensive and specialised equipment (laboratory methods), making their use in clinical practice nearly impossible. On the basis of biometric and kinematic studies, guidelines for interpreting the observation of static and dynamic scapular positioning pattern in patients with shoulder pain are provided. At this point, clinicians can use reliable clinical tests for the assessment of both static and dynamic scapular positioning in patients with shoulder pain. However, this review also provides clinicians several possible pitfalls when performing clinical scapular evaluation. On the basis of its clinical relevance, its proven reliability, its relation to body length and its applicability in a clinical setting, this review recommends to assess the scapula both static (visual observation and acromial distance or Baylor/double square method for shoulder protraction) and semidynamic (visual observation and inclinometry for scapular upward rotation). In addition, when the patient demonstrates with shoulder impingement symptoms, the scapular repositioning test and scapular assistant test are recommended for relating the patients' symptoms to the position or movement of the scapula
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
in press
subject
journal title
BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE
Br. J. Sports Med.
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
4.171 (2013)
JCR rank
6/81 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
0306-3674
DOI
10.1136/bjsports-2012-091059
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
3003522
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-3003522
date created
2012-10-01 20:19:43
date last changed
2013-07-10 14:27:30
@article{3003522,
  abstract     = {Scientific evidence supporting a role for faulty scapular positioning in patients with various shoulder disorders is cumulating. Clinicians who manage patients with shoulder pain and athletes at risk of developing shoulder pain need to have the skills to assess static and dynamic scapular positioning and dynamic control. Several methods for the assessment of scapular positioning are described in scientific literature. However, the majority uses expensive and specialised equipment (laboratory methods), making their use in clinical practice nearly impossible. On the basis of biometric and kinematic studies, guidelines for interpreting the observation of static and dynamic scapular positioning pattern in patients with shoulder pain are provided. At this point, clinicians can use reliable clinical tests for the assessment of both static and dynamic scapular positioning in patients with shoulder pain. However, this review also provides clinicians several possible pitfalls when performing clinical scapular evaluation. On the basis of its clinical relevance, its proven reliability, its relation to body length and its applicability in a clinical setting, this review recommends to assess the scapula both static (visual observation and acromial distance or Baylor/double square method for shoulder protraction) and semidynamic (visual observation and inclinometry for scapular upward rotation). In addition, when the patient demonstrates with shoulder impingement symptoms, the scapular repositioning test and scapular assistant test are recommended for relating the patients' symptoms to the position or movement of the scapula},
  author       = {Struyf, Filip and Nys, Jo and Mottram, Sarah and Roussel, Nathalie A and Cools, Ann and Meeusen, Romain},
  issn         = {0306-3674},
  journal      = {BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE},
  language     = {eng},
  title        = {Clinical assessment of the scapula: a review of the literature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2012-091059},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Struyf, Filip, Jo Nys, Sarah Mottram, Nathalie A Roussel, Ann Cools, and Romain Meeusen. 2013. “Clinical Assessment of the Scapula: a Review of the Literature.” British Journal of Sports Medicine.
APA
Struyf, F., Nys, J., Mottram, S., Roussel, N. A., Cools, A., & Meeusen, R. (2013). Clinical assessment of the scapula: a review of the literature. BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE.
Vancouver
1.
Struyf F, Nys J, Mottram S, Roussel NA, Cools A, Meeusen R. Clinical assessment of the scapula: a review of the literature. BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE. 2013;
MLA
Struyf, Filip, Jo Nys, Sarah Mottram, et al. “Clinical Assessment of the Scapula: a Review of the Literature.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE (2013): n. pag. Print.