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Bioreductive deposition of palladium (0) nanoparticles on Shewanella oneidensis with catalytic activity towards reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls

Wim De Windt, Peter Aelterman UGent and Willy Verstraete UGent (2005) ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 7(3). p.314-325
abstract
Microbial reduction of soluble Pd(II) by cells of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and of an autoaggregating mutant (COAG) resulted in precipitation of palladium Pd(0) nanoparticles on the cell wall and inside the periplasmic space (bioPd). As a result of biosorption and subsequent bioreduction of Pd(II) with H-2, formate, lactate, pyruvate or ethanol as electron donors, recoveries higher than 90% of Pd associated with biomass could be obtained. The bioPd(0) nanoparticles thus obtained had the ability to reductively dehalogenate polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in aqueous and sediment matrices. Bioreduction was observed in assays with concentrations up to 1000 mg Pd(II) l(-1) with depletion of soluble Pd(II) of 77.4% and higher. More than 90% decrease of PCB 21 (2,3,4-chloro biphenyl) coupled to formation of its dechlorination products PCB 5 (2,3-chloro biphenyl) and PCB 1 (2-chloro biphenyl) was obtained at a concentration of 1 mg l(-1) within 5 h at 28degreesC. Bioreductive precipitation of bioPd by S. oneidensis cells mixed with sediment samples contaminated with a mixture of PCB congeners, resulted in dechlorination of both highly and lightly chlorinated PCB congeners adsorbed to the contaminated sediment matrix within 48 h at 28degreesC. Fifty milligrams per litre of bioPd resulted in a catalytic activity that was comparable to 500 mg l(-1) commercial Pd(0) powder. The high reactivity of 50 mg l(-1) bioPd in the soil suspension was reflected in the reduction of the sum of seven most toxic PCBs to 27% of their initial concentration.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
PLATINUM-GROUP METALS, SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA, DESULFOVIBRIO-DESULFURICANS, PRECIPITATION, WATER, GOLD, DEHALOGENATION, REMOVAL, SURFACE, SILVER
journal title
ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
Environ. Microbiol.
volume
7
issue
3
pages
314-325 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000226642600002
JCR category
MICROBIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
4.559 (2005)
JCR rank
12/85 (2005)
JCR quartile
1 (2005)
ISSN
1462-2912
DOI
10.1111/j.1462-2920.2004.00696.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
300318
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-300318
date created
2005-03-21 16:14:00
date last changed
2010-04-08 08:42:40
@article{300318,
  abstract     = {Microbial reduction of soluble Pd(II) by cells of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and of an autoaggregating mutant (COAG) resulted in precipitation of palladium Pd(0) nanoparticles on the cell wall and inside the periplasmic space (bioPd). As a result of biosorption and subsequent bioreduction of Pd(II) with H-2, formate, lactate, pyruvate or ethanol as electron donors, recoveries higher than 90\% of Pd associated with biomass could be obtained. The bioPd(0) nanoparticles thus obtained had the ability to reductively dehalogenate polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners in aqueous and sediment matrices. Bioreduction was observed in assays with concentrations up to 1000 mg Pd(II) l(-1) with depletion of soluble Pd(II) of 77.4\% and higher. More than 90\% decrease of PCB 21 (2,3,4-chloro biphenyl) coupled to formation of its dechlorination products PCB 5 (2,3-chloro biphenyl) and PCB 1 (2-chloro biphenyl) was obtained at a concentration of 1 mg l(-1) within 5 h at 28degreesC. Bioreductive precipitation of bioPd by S. oneidensis cells mixed with sediment samples contaminated with a mixture of PCB congeners, resulted in dechlorination of both highly and lightly chlorinated PCB congeners adsorbed to the contaminated sediment matrix within 48 h at 28degreesC. Fifty milligrams per litre of bioPd resulted in a catalytic activity that was comparable to 500 mg l(-1) commercial Pd(0) powder. The high reactivity of 50 mg l(-1) bioPd in the soil suspension was reflected in the reduction of the sum of seven most toxic PCBs to 27\% of their initial concentration.},
  author       = {De Windt, Wim and Aelterman, Peter and Verstraete, Willy},
  issn         = {1462-2912},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY},
  keyword      = {PLATINUM-GROUP METALS,SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA,DESULFOVIBRIO-DESULFURICANS,PRECIPITATION,WATER,GOLD,DEHALOGENATION,REMOVAL,SURFACE,SILVER},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {314--325},
  title        = {Bioreductive deposition of palladium (0) nanoparticles on Shewanella oneidensis with catalytic activity towards reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1462-2920.2004.00696.x},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2005},
}

Chicago
De Windt, Wim, Peter Aelterman, and Willy Verstraete. 2005. “Bioreductive Deposition of Palladium (0) Nanoparticles on Shewanella Oneidensis with Catalytic Activity Towards Reductive Dechlorination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls.” Environmental Microbiology 7 (3): 314–325.
APA
De Windt, W., Aelterman, P., & Verstraete, W. (2005). Bioreductive deposition of palladium (0) nanoparticles on Shewanella oneidensis with catalytic activity towards reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 7(3), 314–325.
Vancouver
1.
De Windt W, Aelterman P, Verstraete W. Bioreductive deposition of palladium (0) nanoparticles on Shewanella oneidensis with catalytic activity towards reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated biphenyls. ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY. 2005;7(3):314–25.
MLA
De Windt, Wim, Peter Aelterman, and Willy Verstraete. “Bioreductive Deposition of Palladium (0) Nanoparticles on Shewanella Oneidensis with Catalytic Activity Towards Reductive Dechlorination of Polychlorinated Biphenyls.” ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY 7.3 (2005): 314–325. Print.