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The epistemic integrity of scientific research

Jan De Winter UGent and Laszlo Kosolosky UGent (2013) SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ETHICS. 19(3). p.757-774
abstract
We live in a world in which scientific expertise and its epistemic authority become more important. On the other hand, the financial interests in research, which could potentially corrupt science, are increasing. Due to these two tendencies, a concern for the integrity of scientific research becomes increasingly vital. This concern is, however, hollow if we do not have a clear account of research integrity. Therefore, it is important that we explicate this concept. Following Rudolf Carnap's characterization of the task of explication, this means that we should develop a concept that is (1) similar to our common sense notion of research integrity, (2) exact, (3) fruitful, and (4) as simple as possible. Since existing concepts do not meet these four requirements, we develop a new concept in this article. We describe a concept of epistemic integrity that is based on the property of deceptiveness, and argue that this concept does meet Carnap's four requirements of explication. To illustrate and support our claims we use several examples from scientific practice, mainly from biomedical research.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
TRIALS, AUTHORSHIP, Explication, Biomedical research, Deception, Scientific integrity, Research integrity, Epistemic integrity, INDUSTRY
journal title
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ETHICS
volume
19
issue
3
pages
757 - 774
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000323106500008
JCR category
HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
JCR impact factor
1.516 (2013)
JCR rank
3/56 (2013)
JCR quartile
1 (2013)
ISSN
1353-3452
DOI
10.1007/s11948-012-9394-3
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2999532
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2999532
date created
2012-09-26 12:06:13
date last changed
2014-09-12 09:14:50
@article{2999532,
  abstract     = {We live in a world in which scientific expertise and its epistemic authority become more important. On the other hand, the financial interests in research, which could potentially corrupt science, are increasing. Due to these two tendencies, a concern for the integrity of scientific research becomes increasingly vital. This concern is, however, hollow if we do not have a clear account of research integrity. Therefore, it is important that we explicate this concept. Following Rudolf Carnap's characterization of the task of explication, this means that we should develop a concept that is (1) similar to our common sense notion of research integrity, (2) exact, (3) fruitful, and (4) as simple as possible. Since existing concepts do not meet these four requirements, we develop a new concept in this article. We describe a concept of epistemic integrity that is based on the property of deceptiveness, and argue that this concept does meet Carnap's four requirements of explication. To illustrate and support our claims we use several examples from scientific practice, mainly from biomedical research.},
  author       = {De Winter, Jan and Kosolosky, Laszlo},
  issn         = {1353-3452},
  journal      = {SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ETHICS},
  keyword      = {TRIALS,AUTHORSHIP,Explication,Biomedical research,Deception,Scientific integrity,Research integrity,Epistemic integrity,INDUSTRY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {757--774},
  title        = {The epistemic integrity of scientific research},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11948-012-9394-3},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
De Winter, Jan, and Laszlo Kosolosky. 2013. “The Epistemic Integrity of Scientific Research.” Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3): 757–774.
APA
De Winter, J., & Kosolosky, L. (2013). The epistemic integrity of scientific research. SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ETHICS, 19(3), 757–774.
Vancouver
1.
De Winter J, Kosolosky L. The epistemic integrity of scientific research. SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ETHICS. 2013;19(3):757–74.
MLA
De Winter, Jan, and Laszlo Kosolosky. “The Epistemic Integrity of Scientific Research.” SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING ETHICS 19.3 (2013): 757–774. Print.