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Epistemic and technological determinism in development aid

Jan Cherlet UGent (2014) SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & HUMAN VALUES. 39(6). p.773-794
abstract
Since the turn of the millennium, the major development agencies have been promoting "knowledge for development,'' "ICT for development,'' or the "knowledge economy'' as new paradigms to prompt development in less-developed countries. These paradigms display an unconditional trust in the power of Western technology and scientific knowledge to trigger development-they taste of epistemic and technological determinism. This article probes, by means of a genealogy, how and when development cooperation began adhering to epistemic and technological determinism, and which forms this adhesion has taken over time. The genealogy shows, first, that knowledge and technology have always been integrally part of the very "development'' idea since this idea was shaped during enlightenment. Second, while the genealogy reveals that epistemic and technological determinism were embedded in the development idea from the very beginning, it also illustrates that the determinism has always been challenged by critical voices.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
politics, development, power, governance, technological determinism
journal title
SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & HUMAN VALUES
volume
39
issue
6
pages
773 - 794
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000342978500002
JCR category
SOCIAL ISSUES
JCR impact factor
2.194 (2014)
JCR rank
3/41 (2014)
JCR quartile
1 (2014)
ISSN
0162-2439
DOI
10.1177/0162243913516806
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2999351
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2999351
date created
2012-09-26 10:42:16
date last changed
2015-11-27 15:13:50
@article{2999351,
  abstract     = {Since the turn of the millennium, the major development agencies have been promoting {\textacutedbl}knowledge for development,'' {\textacutedbl}ICT for development,'' or the {\textacutedbl}knowledge economy'' as new paradigms to prompt development in less-developed countries. These paradigms display an unconditional trust in the power of Western technology and scientific knowledge to trigger development-they taste of epistemic and technological determinism. This article probes, by means of a genealogy, how and when development cooperation began adhering to epistemic and technological determinism, and which forms this adhesion has taken over time. The genealogy shows, first, that knowledge and technology have always been integrally part of the very {\textacutedbl}development'' idea since this idea was shaped during enlightenment. Second, while the genealogy reveals that epistemic and technological determinism were embedded in the development idea from the very beginning, it also illustrates that the determinism has always been challenged by critical voices.},
  author       = {Cherlet, Jan},
  issn         = {0162-2439},
  journal      = {SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY \& HUMAN VALUES},
  keyword      = {politics,development,power,governance,technological determinism},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {773--794},
  title        = {Epistemic and technological determinism in development aid},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0162243913516806},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2014},
}

Chicago
Cherlet, Jan. 2014. “Epistemic and Technological Determinism in Development Aid.” Science Technology & Human Values 39 (6): 773–794.
APA
Cherlet, J. (2014). Epistemic and technological determinism in development aid. SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & HUMAN VALUES, 39(6), 773–794.
Vancouver
1.
Cherlet J. Epistemic and technological determinism in development aid. SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & HUMAN VALUES. 2014;39(6):773–94.
MLA
Cherlet, Jan. “Epistemic and Technological Determinism in Development Aid.” SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY & HUMAN VALUES 39.6 (2014): 773–794. Print.