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Experimental assessment of ventilation in the bedroom: physiological response to ventilation and impact of position on rebreathing

Jelle Laverge UGent, Atila Novoselac, Richard Corsi and Arnold Janssens UGent (2012) 5th International Building Physics Conference, Proceedings. p.973-980
abstract
In this paper, we report the results of a field study that assesses the effect of increased ventilation rates in the bedroom on sleep quality. In the study, students were tested under two test conditions, one with a high and one with a low ventilation rate. Environmental conditions in the room were recorded, as well as the sleep pattern of the test subjects. The tests were done in the regular sleeping environment of the subjects in order to avoid destabilization of the regular sleep pattern. Carbon dioxide, temperature and relative humidity were measured to assess the indoor environment, while the sleep pattern was recorded using actigraphy. The results seem to suggest that low ventilation rates cause the subject to be more passive during sleep and at the same time to sleep more superficially. In a second experimental setup, the rebreathing rate of sleeping subjects was assessed. For this experiment, breathing thermal mannequins were put in a climate chamber, rested in a bed in different sleeping positions. The exposure was measured through gas-chromatography of the inhaled air of the mannequins. The results of the tests show that, in normal sleeping conditions, rebreathing is low. In specific conditions, however, a significant increase of rebreathing can dramatically increase the exposure of the sleeping subject to his own exhaled air, reducing breathing efficiency and potentially causing hypoxic episodes. We can conclude that the sleeping environment is onsiderably different than that in the rest of the dwelling and should be investigated further in order to develop adjusted ventilation concepts.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
indoor air quality, sleep pattern, sleep, ventilation, rebreathing
in
5th International Building Physics Conference, Proceedings
pages
973 - 980
publisher
5th IBPC Organizing Committee
place of publication
Kyoto, Japan
conference name
5th International Building Physics Conference (IBPC - 2012)
conference location
Kyoto, Japan
conference start
2012-05-28
conference end
2012-05-31
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2998509
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2998509
date created
2012-09-24 14:40:35
date last changed
2012-09-26 15:00:07
@inproceedings{2998509,
  abstract     = {In this paper, we report the results of a field study that assesses the effect of increased ventilation rates in the bedroom on sleep quality. In the study, students were tested under two test conditions, one with a high and one with a low ventilation rate. Environmental conditions in the room were recorded, as well as the sleep pattern of the test subjects. The tests were done in the regular sleeping environment of the subjects in order to avoid destabilization of the regular sleep pattern. Carbon dioxide, temperature and relative humidity were measured to assess the indoor environment, while the sleep pattern was recorded using actigraphy. The results seem to suggest that low ventilation rates cause the subject to be more passive during sleep and at the same time to sleep more superficially. In a second experimental setup, the rebreathing rate of sleeping subjects was assessed. For this experiment, breathing thermal mannequins were put in a climate chamber, rested in a bed in different sleeping positions. The exposure was measured through gas-chromatography of the inhaled air of the mannequins. The results of the tests show that, in normal sleeping conditions, rebreathing is low. In specific conditions, however, a significant increase of rebreathing can dramatically increase the exposure of the sleeping subject to his own exhaled air, reducing breathing efficiency and potentially causing hypoxic episodes. We can conclude that the sleeping environment is onsiderably different than that in the rest of the dwelling and should be investigated further in order to develop adjusted ventilation concepts.},
  author       = {Laverge, Jelle and Novoselac, Atila and Corsi, Richard and Janssens, Arnold},
  booktitle    = {5th International Building Physics Conference, Proceedings},
  keyword      = {indoor air quality,sleep pattern,sleep,ventilation,rebreathing},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Kyoto, Japan},
  pages        = {973--980},
  publisher    = {5th IBPC Organizing Committee},
  title        = {Experimental assessment of ventilation in the bedroom: physiological response to ventilation and impact of position on rebreathing},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Laverge, Jelle, Atila Novoselac, Richard Corsi, and Arnold Janssens. 2012. “Experimental Assessment of Ventilation in the Bedroom: Physiological Response to Ventilation and Impact of Position on Rebreathing.” In 5th International Building Physics Conference, Proceedings, 973–980. Kyoto, Japan: 5th IBPC Organizing Committee.
APA
Laverge, J., Novoselac, A., Corsi, R., & Janssens, A. (2012). Experimental assessment of ventilation in the bedroom: physiological response to ventilation and impact of position on rebreathing. 5th International Building Physics Conference, Proceedings (pp. 973–980). Presented at the 5th International Building Physics Conference (IBPC - 2012), Kyoto, Japan: 5th IBPC Organizing Committee.
Vancouver
1.
Laverge J, Novoselac A, Corsi R, Janssens A. Experimental assessment of ventilation in the bedroom: physiological response to ventilation and impact of position on rebreathing. 5th International Building Physics Conference, Proceedings. Kyoto, Japan: 5th IBPC Organizing Committee; 2012. p. 973–80.
MLA
Laverge, Jelle, Atila Novoselac, Richard Corsi, et al. “Experimental Assessment of Ventilation in the Bedroom: Physiological Response to Ventilation and Impact of Position on Rebreathing.” 5th International Building Physics Conference, Proceedings. Kyoto, Japan: 5th IBPC Organizing Committee, 2012. 973–980. Print.