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Reactive oxygen gene network of plants

(2004) TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE. 9(10). p.490-498
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Abstract
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) control many different processes in plants. However, being toxic molecules, they are also capable of injuring cells. How this conflict is resolved in plants is largely unknown. Nonetheless, it is clear that the steady-state level of ROS in cells needs to be tightly regulated. In Arabidopsis, a network of at least 152 genes is involved in managing the level of ROS. This network is highly dynamic and redundant, and encodes ROS-scavenging and ROS-producing proteins. Although recent studies have unraveled some of the key players in the network, many questions related to its mode of regulation, its protective roles and its modulation of signaling networks that control growth, development and stress response remain unanswered.
Keywords
WATER-WATER CYCLE, PEA GLUTATHIONE-REDUCTASE, OXIDATIVE STRESS, HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE, ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA, ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE, ACTIVE OXYGEN, CELL-DEATH, COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS, SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE

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Citation

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Chicago
Mittler, Ron, Sandy Vanderauwera, Martin Gollery, and Frank Van Breusegem. 2004. “Reactive Oxygen Gene Network of Plants.” Trends in Plant Science 9 (10): 490–498.
APA
Mittler, R., Vanderauwera, S., Gollery, M., & Van Breusegem, F. (2004). Reactive oxygen gene network of plants. TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE, 9(10), 490–498.
Vancouver
1.
Mittler R, Vanderauwera S, Gollery M, Van Breusegem F. Reactive oxygen gene network of plants. TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE. 2004;9(10):490–8.
MLA
Mittler, Ron, Sandy Vanderauwera, Martin Gollery, et al. “Reactive Oxygen Gene Network of Plants.” TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE 9.10 (2004): 490–498. Print.
@article{299658,
  abstract     = {Reactive oxygen species (ROS) control many different processes in plants. However, being toxic molecules, they are also capable of injuring cells. How this conflict is resolved in plants is largely unknown. Nonetheless, it is clear that the steady-state level of ROS in cells needs to be tightly regulated. In Arabidopsis, a network of at least 152 genes is involved in managing the level of ROS. This network is highly dynamic and redundant, and encodes ROS-scavenging and ROS-producing proteins. Although recent studies have unraveled some of the key players in the network, many questions related to its mode of regulation, its protective roles and its modulation of signaling networks that control growth, development and stress response remain unanswered.},
  author       = {Mittler, Ron and Vanderauwera, Sandy and Gollery, Martin and Van Breusegem, Frank},
  issn         = {1360-1385},
  journal      = {TRENDS IN PLANT SCIENCE},
  keyword      = {WATER-WATER CYCLE,PEA GLUTATHIONE-REDUCTASE,OXIDATIVE STRESS,HYDROGEN-PEROXIDE,ARABIDOPSIS-THALIANA,ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE,ACTIVE OXYGEN,CELL-DEATH,COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS,SUPEROXIDE-DISMUTASE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {490--498},
  title        = {Reactive oxygen gene network of plants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tplants.2004.08.009},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2004},
}

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