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Surface polysaccharides enable bacteria to evade plant immunity

Wim D'Haeze (UGent) and Marcella Holsters (UGent)
(2004) TRENDS IN MICROBIOLOGY. 12(12). p.555-561
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Abstract
Plants have an immune system to perceive pathogenic or potentially beneficial bacteria. Aspects of perception, signal transduction and the responses that the plant produces resemble features of innate immunity observed in animals. Plant reactions are various and include the production of antimicrobial compounds. Bacteria that are successful in establishing pathogenic or symbiotic interactions have developed multiple ways to protect themselves. We review the general importance of bacterial surface polysaccharides in the evasion of plant immune responses and elaborate on their role in protecting symbiotic bacteria against toxic reactive oxygen species during invasion of the host plant.
Keywords
NODULE INVASION, MEDICAGO-SATIVA, LEGUME SYMBIOSIS, SALMONELLA-TYPHIMURIUM, DISEASE-RESISTANCE, RHIZOBIUM-LEGUMINOSARUM, MYCOBACTERIUM-TUBERCULOSIS, LIPID-A, PROGRAMMED CELL-DEATH, NITRIC-OXIDE

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
D’Haeze, Wim, and Marcella Holsters. 2004. “Surface Polysaccharides Enable Bacteria to Evade Plant Immunity.” Trends in Microbiology 12 (12): 555–561.
APA
D’Haeze, W., & Holsters, M. (2004). Surface polysaccharides enable bacteria to evade plant immunity. TRENDS IN MICROBIOLOGY, 12(12), 555–561.
Vancouver
1.
D’Haeze W, Holsters M. Surface polysaccharides enable bacteria to evade plant immunity. TRENDS IN MICROBIOLOGY. 2004;12(12):555–61.
MLA
D’Haeze, Wim, and Marcella Holsters. “Surface Polysaccharides Enable Bacteria to Evade Plant Immunity.” TRENDS IN MICROBIOLOGY 12.12 (2004): 555–561. Print.
@article{298786,
  abstract     = {Plants have an immune system to perceive pathogenic or potentially beneficial bacteria. Aspects of perception, signal transduction and the responses that the plant produces resemble features of innate immunity observed in animals. Plant reactions are various and include the production of antimicrobial compounds. Bacteria that are successful in establishing pathogenic or symbiotic interactions have developed multiple ways to protect themselves. We review the general importance of bacterial surface polysaccharides in the evasion of plant immune responses and elaborate on their role in protecting symbiotic bacteria against toxic reactive oxygen species during invasion of the host plant.},
  author       = {D'Haeze, Wim and Holsters, Marcella},
  issn         = {0966-842X},
  journal      = {TRENDS IN MICROBIOLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {555--561},
  title        = {Surface polysaccharides enable bacteria to evade plant immunity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tim.2004.10.009},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2004},
}

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