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Adjectival periphrasis in Ancient Greek: the categorial status of the participle

Klaas Bentein UGent (2013) ACTA CLASSICA. 56. p.1-28
abstract
In this article, I discuss constructions consisting of Ancient Greek εἰμί “I am” and a present, perfect or aorist participle. More in particular, I focus on those cases where the participle is said to have an ‘adjectival’ (i.e. property-referring) function. My main goal is to clarify the categorial status of the participle. I argue that the participle used in this type of construction should not be considered ‘adjectivized’, but rather located on an intracategorial continuum. I close the article by discussing the relationship between the concepts of ‘adjectival’ and ‘verbal’ periphrasis, showing that they should not be considered mutually exclusive, as has been previously assumed.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
verbal periphrasis, adjectival periphrasis, Ancient Greek, categorial status, intracategorial continuum, GRAMMAR, DISCOURSE, TRANSITIVITY, VERBAL PERIPHRASIS, participle
journal title
ACTA CLASSICA
Acta Class.
volume
56
pages
1 - 28
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000329443700001
ISSN
0065-1141
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2987517
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2987517
date created
2012-09-15 13:17:45
date last changed
2014-08-25 16:54:30
@article{2987517,
  abstract     = {In this article, I discuss constructions consisting of Ancient Greek \ensuremath{\epsilon}\unmatched{1f30}\ensuremath{\mu}\unmatched{1f77} {\textquotedblleft}I am{\textquotedblright} and a present, perfect or aorist participle. More in particular, I focus on those cases where the participle is said to have an {\textquoteleft}adjectival{\textquoteright} (i.e. property-referring) function. My main goal is to clarify the categorial status of the participle. I argue that the participle used in this type of construction should not be considered {\textquoteleft}adjectivized{\textquoteright}, but rather located on an intracategorial continuum. I close the article by discussing the relationship between the concepts of {\textquoteleft}adjectival{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}verbal{\textquoteright} periphrasis, showing that they should not be considered mutually exclusive, as has been previously assumed.},
  author       = {Bentein, Klaas},
  issn         = {0065-1141},
  journal      = {ACTA CLASSICA},
  keyword      = {verbal periphrasis,adjectival periphrasis,Ancient Greek,categorial status,intracategorial continuum,GRAMMAR,DISCOURSE,TRANSITIVITY,VERBAL PERIPHRASIS,participle},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--28},
  title        = {Adjectival periphrasis in Ancient Greek: the categorial status of the participle},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Bentein, Klaas. 2013. “Adjectival Periphrasis in Ancient Greek: The Categorial Status of the Participle.” Acta Classica 56: 1–28.
APA
Bentein, K. (2013). Adjectival periphrasis in Ancient Greek: the categorial status of the participle. ACTA CLASSICA, 56, 1–28.
Vancouver
1.
Bentein K. Adjectival periphrasis in Ancient Greek: the categorial status of the participle. ACTA CLASSICA. 2013;56:1–28.
MLA
Bentein, Klaas. “Adjectival Periphrasis in Ancient Greek: The Categorial Status of the Participle.” ACTA CLASSICA 56 (2013): 1–28. Print.