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HAVE-perfects in post-classical and early Byzantine Greek

Klaas Bentein UGent (2013) EMERITA. 81(1). p.151-182
abstract
In this article, I analyze the use and development of periphrastic perfect constructions with the Ancient Greek verb ‘have’ (ἔχω) in Post-classical and Early Byzantine Greek. To be more specific, I discuss the following four constructions: (a) ἔχω with active/middle aorist participle (anterior), (b) ἔχω with passive perfect participle (resultative), (c) ἔχω with passive aorist or present participle (resultative), and (d) ἔχω with active/middle aorist or present participle and a temporal adjunct (anterior). My analysis is based on a register-balanced corpus of texts, whereby I distinguish between works of a ‘low’, ‘middle’ and ‘high’ register.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Ancient Greek, perfect, HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS, register, diachrony, periphrasis
journal title
EMERITA
Emerita
volume
81
issue
1
pages
151 - 182
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000321517500008
ISSN
0013-6662
DOI
10.3989/emerita.2013.08.1130
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2987515
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2987515
date created
2012-09-15 13:10:07
date last changed
2014-09-12 13:53:12
@article{2987515,
  abstract     = {In this article, I analyze the use and development of periphrastic perfect constructions with the Ancient Greek verb {\textquoteleft}have{\textquoteright} (\unmatched{1f14}\ensuremath{\chi}\ensuremath{\omega}) in Post-classical and Early Byzantine Greek. To be more specific, I discuss the following four constructions: (a) \unmatched{1f14}\ensuremath{\chi}\ensuremath{\omega} with active/middle aorist participle (anterior), (b) \unmatched{1f14}\ensuremath{\chi}\ensuremath{\omega} with passive perfect participle (resultative), (c) \unmatched{1f14}\ensuremath{\chi}\ensuremath{\omega} with passive aorist or present participle (resultative), and (d) \unmatched{1f14}\ensuremath{\chi}\ensuremath{\omega} with active/middle aorist or present participle and a temporal adjunct (anterior). My analysis is based on a register-balanced corpus of texts, whereby I distinguish between works of a {\textquoteleft}low{\textquoteright}, {\textquoteleft}middle{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}high{\textquoteright} register.},
  author       = {Bentein, Klaas},
  issn         = {0013-6662},
  journal      = {EMERITA},
  keyword      = {Ancient Greek,perfect,HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS,register,diachrony,periphrasis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {151--182},
  title        = {HAVE-perfects in post-classical and early Byzantine Greek},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3989/emerita.2013.08.1130},
  volume       = {81},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Bentein, Klaas. 2013. “HAVE-perfects in Post-classical and Early Byzantine Greek.” Emerita 81 (1): 151–182.
APA
Bentein, K. (2013). HAVE-perfects in post-classical and early Byzantine Greek. EMERITA, 81(1), 151–182.
Vancouver
1.
Bentein K. HAVE-perfects in post-classical and early Byzantine Greek. EMERITA. 2013;81(1):151–82.
MLA
Bentein, Klaas. “HAVE-perfects in Post-classical and Early Byzantine Greek.” EMERITA 81.1 (2013): 151–182. Print.