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Control of programmed cell death during plant reproductive development

Yadira Olvera Carrillo (UGent) , Yuliya Salanenka (UGent) and Moritz Nowack (UGent)
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Abstract
Programmed cell death (PCD) is an actively controlled, genetically encoded self-destruct mechanism of the cell. While many forms of PCD have been described and molecularly dissected in animals, we know to date only little about the control of PCD processes in plants. Nevertheless, plant PCD is a crucial component of a plant’s reaction to its biotic and abiotic environment and a central theme during plant development. In this chapter, we review the communication events triggering and executing, or preventing, PCD during plant reproductive development. These comprise intracellular communication, as well as signaling between cells and tissues, and the intricate communication between genetically distinct individuals that are necessary for successful plant reproduction.

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MLA
Olvera Carrillo, Yadira, et al. “Control of Programmed Cell Death during Plant Reproductive Development.” Biocommunication of Plants, edited by Günther Witzany and František Baluška, vol. 14, Springer, 2012, pp. 171–96.
APA
Olvera Carrillo, Y., Salanenka, Y., & Nowack, M. (2012). Control of programmed cell death during plant reproductive development. In G. Witzany & F. Baluška (Eds.), Biocommunication of plants (Vol. 14, pp. 171–196). Berlin, Germany: Springer.
Chicago author-date
Olvera Carrillo, Yadira, Yuliya Salanenka, and Moritz Nowack. 2012. “Control of Programmed Cell Death during Plant Reproductive Development.” In Biocommunication of Plants, edited by Günther Witzany and František Baluška, 14:171–96. Berlin, Germany: Springer.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Olvera Carrillo, Yadira, Yuliya Salanenka, and Moritz Nowack. 2012. “Control of Programmed Cell Death during Plant Reproductive Development.” In Biocommunication of Plants, ed by. Günther Witzany and František Baluška, 14:171–196. Berlin, Germany: Springer.
Vancouver
1.
Olvera Carrillo Y, Salanenka Y, Nowack M. Control of programmed cell death during plant reproductive development. In: Witzany G, Baluška F, editors. Biocommunication of plants. Berlin, Germany: Springer; 2012. p. 171–96.
IEEE
[1]
Y. Olvera Carrillo, Y. Salanenka, and M. Nowack, “Control of programmed cell death during plant reproductive development,” in Biocommunication of plants, vol. 14, G. Witzany and F. Baluška, Eds. Berlin, Germany: Springer, 2012, pp. 171–196.
@incollection{2985597,
  abstract     = {Programmed cell death (PCD) is an actively controlled, genetically encoded self-destruct mechanism of the cell. While many forms of PCD have been described and molecularly dissected in animals, we know to date only little about the control of PCD processes in plants. Nevertheless, plant PCD is a crucial component of a plant’s reaction to its biotic and abiotic environment and a central theme during plant development. In this chapter, we review the communication events triggering and executing, or preventing, PCD during plant reproductive development. These comprise intracellular communication, as well as signaling between cells and tissues, and the intricate communication between genetically distinct individuals that are necessary for successful plant reproduction.},
  author       = {Olvera Carrillo, Yadira and Salanenka, Yuliya and Nowack, Moritz},
  booktitle    = {Biocommunication of plants},
  editor       = {Witzany, Günther and Baluška, František},
  isbn         = {9783642235238},
  issn         = {1867-9048},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {171--196},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Signaling and Communication in Plants},
  title        = {Control of programmed cell death during plant reproductive development},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-23524-5_10},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2012},
}

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