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Estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress with ground-based thermal remote sensing in agriculture: a review

Wouter Maes UGent and Kathy Steppe UGent (2012) JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY. 63(13). p.4671-4712
abstract
As evaporation of water is an energy-demanding process, increasing evapotranspiration rates decrease the surface temperature (Ts) of leaves and plants. Based on this principle, ground-based thermal remote sensing has become one of the most important methods for estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress and for irrigation. This paper reviews its application in agriculture. The review consists of four parts. First, the basics of thermal remote sensing are briefly reviewed. Second, the theoretical relation between Ts and the sensible and latent heat flux is elaborated. A modelling approach was used to evaluate the effect of weather conditions and leaf or vegetation properties on leaf and canopy temperature. Ts increases with increasing air temperature and incoming radiation and with decreasing wind speed and relative humidity. At the leaf level, the leaf angle and leaf dimension have a large influence on Ts; at the vegetation level, Ts is strongly impacted by the roughness length. In the third part, an overview of the different ground-based thermal remote sensing techniques and approaches used to estimate drought stress or evapotranspiration in agriculture is provided. Among other methods, stress time, stress degree day, crop water stress index (CWSI), and stomatal conductance index are discussed. The theoretical models are used to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the most important methods, corroborating the literature data. In the fourth and final part, a critical view on the future and remaining challenges of ground-based thermal remote sensing is presented.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
thermal camera, leaf temperature, Canopy temperature, grapevine, infrared thermography, non-contact thermocouple, corn, wheat
journal title
JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY
J. Exp. Bot.
volume
63
issue
13
pages
4671 - 4712
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000308010700002
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
5.242 (2012)
JCR rank
13/193 (2012)
JCR quartile
1 (2012)
ISSN
0022-0957
DOI
10.1093/jxb/ers165
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2979024
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2979024
date created
2012-09-05 10:08:53
date last changed
2012-09-28 11:33:13
@article{2979024,
  abstract     = {As evaporation of water is an energy-demanding process, increasing evapotranspiration rates decrease the surface temperature (Ts) of leaves and plants. Based on this principle, ground-based thermal remote sensing has become one of the most important methods for estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress and for irrigation. This paper reviews its application in agriculture. The review consists of four parts. First, the basics of thermal remote sensing are briefly reviewed. Second, the theoretical relation between Ts and the sensible and latent heat flux is elaborated. A modelling approach was used to evaluate the effect of weather conditions and leaf or vegetation properties on leaf and canopy temperature. Ts increases with increasing air temperature and incoming radiation and with decreasing wind speed and relative humidity. At the leaf level, the leaf angle and leaf dimension have a large influence on Ts; at the vegetation level, Ts is strongly impacted by the roughness length. In the third part, an overview of the different ground-based thermal remote sensing techniques and approaches used to estimate drought stress or evapotranspiration in agriculture is provided. Among other methods, stress time, stress degree day, crop water stress index (CWSI), and stomatal conductance index are discussed. The theoretical models are used to evaluate the performance and sensitivity of the most important methods, corroborating the literature data. In the fourth and final part, a critical view on the future and remaining challenges of ground-based thermal remote sensing is presented.},
  author       = {Maes, Wouter and Steppe, Kathy},
  issn         = {0022-0957},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY},
  keyword      = {thermal camera,leaf temperature,Canopy temperature,grapevine,infrared thermography,non-contact thermocouple,corn,wheat},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {13},
  pages        = {4671--4712},
  title        = {Estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress with ground-based thermal remote sensing in agriculture: a review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jxb/ers165},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Maes, Wouter, and Kathy Steppe. 2012. “Estimating Evapotranspiration and Drought Stress with Ground-based Thermal Remote Sensing in Agriculture: a Review.” Journal of Experimental Botany 63 (13): 4671–4712.
APA
Maes, Wouter, & Steppe, K. (2012). Estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress with ground-based thermal remote sensing in agriculture: a review. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY, 63(13), 4671–4712.
Vancouver
1.
Maes W, Steppe K. Estimating evapotranspiration and drought stress with ground-based thermal remote sensing in agriculture: a review. JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY. 2012;63(13):4671–712.
MLA
Maes, Wouter, and Kathy Steppe. “Estimating Evapotranspiration and Drought Stress with Ground-based Thermal Remote Sensing in Agriculture: a Review.” JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BOTANY 63.13 (2012): 4671–4712. Print.