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'Ave (aunque muda yo)': the image of the nightingale in Góngora's love sonnets

Elizabeth Amann UGent (2013) SYMPOSIUM-A QUARTERLY JOURNAL IN MODERN LITERATURES. 67(2). p.63-74
abstract
The nightingale is one of the most metatextual symbols in poetry, but its meaning varies considerably from one context to another. In the works of some poets, the bird is a figure of orality, a symbol of virtuosity in singing. In others, however, it is a metaphor for writing. In classical mythology, the nightingale is the metamorphosis of Philomela, who after being raped and having her tongue cut out by Tereus, reveals what has happened to her by weaving a tapestry with images of Tereus's transgression. The bird is thus associated with silent signs that resemble those of a text. This essay examines the representation of the nightingale in three sonnets by the Baroque poet Luis de Gongora, and contrasts his use of the image with that of Garcilaso de la Vega. Whereas Garcilaso represents the nightingale as an ideal of perfect singing and as a natural analogue of the poet, Gongora emphasizes its writerly nature and creates a more complicated relationship between the lyric voice and the bird.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
'NO-SON-TODOS-RUISENORES'
journal title
SYMPOSIUM-A QUARTERLY JOURNAL IN MODERN LITERATURES
volume
67
issue
2
pages
63 - 74
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000320570400001
ISSN
0039-7709
DOI
10.1080/00397709.2013.790277
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
2974952
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-2974952
date created
2012-08-27 07:39:44
date last changed
2014-10-01 00:32:37
@article{2974952,
  abstract     = {The nightingale is one of the most metatextual symbols in poetry, but its meaning varies considerably from one context to another. In the works of some poets, the bird is a figure of orality, a symbol of virtuosity in singing. In others, however, it is a metaphor for writing. In classical mythology, the nightingale is the metamorphosis of Philomela, who after being raped and having her tongue cut out by Tereus, reveals what has happened to her by weaving a tapestry with images of Tereus's transgression. The bird is thus associated with silent signs that resemble those of a text. This essay examines the representation of the nightingale in three sonnets by the Baroque poet Luis de Gongora, and contrasts his use of the image with that of Garcilaso de la Vega. Whereas Garcilaso represents the nightingale as an ideal of perfect singing and as a natural analogue of the poet, Gongora emphasizes its writerly nature and creates a more complicated relationship between the lyric voice and the bird.},
  author       = {Amann, Elizabeth},
  issn         = {0039-7709},
  journal      = {SYMPOSIUM-A QUARTERLY JOURNAL IN MODERN LITERATURES},
  keyword      = {'NO-SON-TODOS-RUISENORES'},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {63--74},
  title        = {'Ave (aunque muda yo)': the image of the nightingale in G{\'o}ngora's love sonnets},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00397709.2013.790277},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2013},
}

Chicago
Amann, Elizabeth. 2013. “‘Ave (aunque Muda Yo)’: The Image of the Nightingale in Góngora’s Love Sonnets.” Symposium-a Quarterly Journal in Modern Literatures 67 (2): 63–74.
APA
Amann, E. (2013). “Ave (aunque muda yo)”: the image of the nightingale in Góngora’s love sonnets. SYMPOSIUM-A QUARTERLY JOURNAL IN MODERN LITERATURES, 67(2), 63–74.
Vancouver
1.
Amann E. “Ave (aunque muda yo)”: the image of the nightingale in Góngora’s love sonnets. SYMPOSIUM-A QUARTERLY JOURNAL IN MODERN LITERATURES. 2013;67(2):63–74.
MLA
Amann, Elizabeth. “‘Ave (aunque Muda Yo)’: The Image of the Nightingale in Góngora’s Love Sonnets.” SYMPOSIUM-A QUARTERLY JOURNAL IN MODERN LITERATURES 67.2 (2013): 63–74. Print.